Reviews

Bad Feminist: Essays by Roxane Gay

abeplaut's review against another edition

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emotional reflective fast-paced

4.5

missbookiverse's review against another edition

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4.0

I agree with most of what Gay has to say and I enjoyed hearing her elaborate thoughts on topics ranging from feminism, race, and rape culture to movies, books, and Scrabble. She's precise, funny, and smart in her argumentation. Be warned though that she's not afraid to spoil major plot twists of certain stories. My favorite essay probably was Not Here To Make Friends (which you can also read online) about the importance and justification of unlikable characters. In general, I liked how unabashedly Gay admits to liking certain books and shows that might be considered "guilty pleasures" and still dissects them critically. It's ok to criticize something and still enjoy it. It's ok, as her last fantastic essay states, to be a bad feminist.

veryill's review against another edition

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funny informative reflective medium-paced

3.75

lannnnnnnnnaaaaaaaaa's review against another edition

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challenging funny informative inspiring fast-paced

4.5

megalithic28's review against another edition

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challenging reflective medium-paced

5.0

carlatemis's review against another edition

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challenging informative medium-paced

4.0

emigrimm's review against another edition

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5.0

I've heard of Roxane Gay and seen her books for the past few years, but did not realize that she was a professor at Purdue while I was there for undergrad. It was so interesting to hear her mention a campus I am so intimately familiar with, or describe a traveling art exhibition in Indianapolis that I also happened to attend on a 4-H trip. Back then, I was a baby feminist who didn't know anything about IUDs or intersectionality. Although the book was written in 2014, it was so interesting to see how much has changed in the world and in myself.

Although the writing style was beautiful and each essay was insightful, this book was difficult to read in large chunks. The book starts out relatively light with Gay discussing her childhood and personal life, but soon moves into many deeply moving topics. An eleven-year-old girl who was gang raped, described as "dressed like a twenty-year-old" by the New York Times, as if a woman of any age ever invites being raped by 18 different men. The lack of representation for people of color in media, and what little representation is shown often being relegated to tired, worn-out stereotypes. Police brutality. Racial profiling. The struggle of women to control their own bodies and future. I often had to set the book down for a bit just to think about a process her words, and the similar situations that have happened to me or to those close to me. Although this book was written before same-sex marriage was legalized and before the #MeToo movement, her essays cut straight to the heart of many important topics.

gwalt118's review against another edition

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3.0

There were essays I loved -- particularly the ones about privilege and women's rights. There were others that I didn't care for -- particularly the ones related to pop culture. But, overall, it was a great novel and one that I would highly recommend to anyone interested in women and feminist issues.

corine's review against another edition

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funny informative reflective fast-paced

3.75

hollandaisesause's review against another edition

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challenging dark emotional funny hopeful informative inspiring reflective sad medium-paced

4.25

an intersectional view I truly needed