Reviews for An Autumn War, by Daniel Abraham

birte's review

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adventurous dark tense medium-paced
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.75

malkav11's review

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5.0

Fantastic. The looming Galt threat hinted at in behind-the-scenes machinations in the first two books arrives in the form of all out war on the cities of the Khaiem...a war long thought suicidal, but the general of the Galt forces has found a way to make it happen. We see the conflict from both sides, and while we can sympathize with the motives of the general, two books of investment in Otah Machi & company ensure that we have to hope that they manage to pull some sort of victory out from onrushing defeat. And ultimately the end is absolutely the only thing that could have happened, pyrrhic and yet transformative, the perfect capstone to a magnificent book.

braydin's review

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5.0

War finally comes to the Long Price universe. Again, set 15 years after book 2, Otah is looking to the future and trying to prepare his people for life without the andat. Meanwhile, the Galts have found a poet of their own and are looking to use him to put an end to the andat. Enough betrayal to make your head spin, An Autumn War is a fast paced read that was well worth the effort.

On an unrelated note, the lack of availability of this series in my semi-local bookstores (read Barnes and Nobles) has surprised me a little. The series has had, as far as I can tell, very good critical reception but were it not for a chance review and later finding books two and three in a used bookstore, I probably would not have ever found this series.

hawkeye7e720's review

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4.0

This book came very close to being a 5-star one to me. The only thing that kept it at 4 is the characters, which makes my review of the book even more difficult.

I'm not a fan of any of these characters. I don't feel a special attachment to them and actually don't care what happens to them. However, and this is the weird part, I feel for the situation they are in. I can relate to both the people of the Khaiem's desperation against the Galts, and I can also relate to the Galtic Empire's desire to rid the world of the andat.

After a rough start with the first book, Abraham has turned into a writer that I'm looking forward to reading more of.

jeffy's review

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5.0

The first two books in this series were thought provoking with fascinating world building and refreshingly character-driven plots.

This one just blows the roof off. Without giving away the details, this could be a down-in-flames ending for a series. Instead it's the third book of four.

While the plot keeps the pages turning, it's the characters that move the plot and they're quite the characters. Even the most despicable human characters are believable in a way that doesn't just show you how they got that way, but makes you want to forgive them for the evil that they do. And vice versa, the "good guys" are all deeply flawed just like real people.

It would be worth reading the first two books to get to this one even if they weren't pretty good books in their own right. I want to rush on to the final volume, but I also want to sit with this one for a little while.

hadaad's review

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The best book in the series, so far. I enjoyed the other two immensely, but the stakes were just so much higher in this book, and Abraham pulled it off wonderfully.

eowyn's review

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5.0

Great continuation of this excellent fantasy series. It's fantasy only because it's a made up world with a little bit of magic that isn't really magic (what it is is much more interesting to me). I would compare these books to George R.R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire (Game of Thrones) in that it's much more of a socio-political story of a particular culture going through tumultuous times and told through several characters' individual experiences. But it's much, much less violent and the characters are much more sympathetic while still being complicated and realistic people. One unique thing about the 4 books in this series is that each one takes place 10-15 years after the one before. So we're getting to know these same characters as teens/young adults, then in their 30s, now middle-aged, and over 60 in the last book. Interesting ideas, great characters, well-written, lots of empathy for the characters even the bad guys by the author. Highly recommend to adult fantasy lovers.

andyg's review

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4.0

possibly the best book in the series so far. So good to read a nuanced epic fantasy series.

bookaneer's review

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3.0

So many twists and turns. I have a lot of questions. Not sure I have somebody to root for anymore except Eiah.

aleanil's review

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4.0

Much improved over the first two books. They did a good job of setting the scene for what happens here, and it carried a far more interesting conflict than previous.