jentrification's review against another edition

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good primer for brands and orgs wishing to bring the concepts of design thinking to their workplace.

kaianicole's review against another edition

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3.0

Another 3.5 stars. Really good ideas, average execution. I often would get lost in the myriad of tiny examples he provided and have to back up to figure out what he was trying to illustrate.

jakew's review

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4.0

4/5

Excellent overview of design thinking and the origins, along with some basics on tools and mindset for successful implementation. Also enjoyed the tie ins with how to change organizations, something I am particularly interested in.

mcsquared's review against another edition

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4.0

A lot of good insight about role of design in project management and product development.

dylan's review

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3.0

The thesis is solid, but if it were written today I would see this more as a series of blog posts than a full-on book. It also felt geared towards people who have no interest or faith in design (not necessarily bad but it made for a conflicted reading experience).

alap's review

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3.0

A useful primer to the world of design thinking

While interesting, the book is by no means a one stop or exhaustive collection of knowledge that will teach you design thinking. Further while the examples are extreme,y compelling, I wish there were more of them, with more defined statistics and proof of their impact. The bottom line is this is a good primer, which sets you up for further study into the designers way...

sethd's review

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4.0

Brown does a great job explaining his concept of design thinking. He differentiates between design and design thinking and between designers and design thinkers, while making the point that anyone can be a design thinker. This and Kelley's "Ten Faces of Innovation" have not surprisingly a bit of overlap both in concept and in anecdotes. While I didn't read them in this order, I think reading this book first would be better as it is more principle-driven and inspirational whereas Kelley's book gets more into practices and details around different roles that can aid in innovation.

kiki's review

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informative medium-paced

3.0

Very basic, and a bit too self-aggrandizing for my taste. Has some comical moments of being incredibly out of touch with the lived reality for many people under current capitalist systems. Perhaps just a case of misplaced expectations, but didn't feel like I took much away from the book – probably not for someone who already has a fairly solid understanding of design thinking. 
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