Reviews tagging Bullying

To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee

7 reviews

amyhamilton's review

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challenging emotional funny hopeful informative reflective slow-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.0


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c45p1n's review

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tense fast-paced
  • Strong character development? No
  • Loveable characters? No
  • Diverse cast of characters? No

0.25

I read this book as a class assignment, and all I have to say is f--k this "classic piece of literature" it's a racist and bigoted story written by a racist white woman. It's hardly a classic and despite "teaching prejudice" and "learning about racism" it is terrible for modern-day learning and there are so many better stories you could force students to read. Modern stories, written by people who actually understand bigotry and what it's like to be discriminated against for something like skin color and racial background. I overall despise this book. 

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amavi's review against another edition

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emotional funny hopeful informative inspiring reflective sad fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

5.0

I assumed that this book was going to be very sad so I avoided it. It does deal with a tragic destiny of an innocent man but that sort of falls behind. I really liked some of the characters, the setting was interesting, the subject discussed very important. I wanted to read more about how the family and the whole community developed


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senny's review against another edition

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challenging dark emotional informative reflective sad tense slow-paced

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chaoticfia's review against another edition

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challenging emotional funny inspiring reflective tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? It's complicated
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.25

I absolutely adored Scout's narrative voice: the balance of childishness and maturity was excellent. The plot was well-written, and the book was engaging. However, it was a little difficult to get into, and the datedness of the language means I'm pretty sure I missed a couple of pretty significant things.

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gagne's review

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adventurous mysterious reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

4.25


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mariakureads's review against another edition

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challenging emotional sad tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

5.0

I remember first reading this book years ago in school as part of an assignment like most kids do which I'll be honest, made reading the book unenjoyable in a sense because it was forced upon but now as an adult, I decided to revisit this classic.

Read by Sissy Spacek, her warm voice depicts the first person perspective of Scout Finch as that imaginative young mind that is trying to make sense of the world around her as she is seeing her town in a very different light as her father, a very prominent lawyer, is appointed to defend Tom Robinson, a black man falsely accused of raping a white woman in a small southern segregated town. Spacek's tone was great; showcasing a range of emotions varying on the words she brings you into the story and ride along with Scout as this trial progresses and becomes a focus of the town.

I believed it then and will say it now that the first person view point of the book is what still catches my eye as this is told from a younger perspective, one who has yet to know all that they will later but also one that has ever had to worry about skin color so having the book in that viewpoint, Scout questions, remarks, and sees that not all things are as they should be which leads to her father trying his best to give the answers by word and deed as he tries his best to defend Mr. Robinson against all odds.

For a book written in 1960, it saddens me to think that very little has changed, based on geography,  there is a mass racial disparity in our nation and one that many can no longer ignore. Here is a book that still creates discussions, still questions, and still makes it clear why the harder topics should not only be discussed but should be a focus for change and raises that awareness which is why some schools still talk about and remove from school curriculums and yet is still read, still a topic, and further more showcases many life lessons that we are still in need of. 

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