Reviews

Abandon, by Meg Cabot

laci's review

Go to review page

2.0

I imagine this is what Twilight feels like. The story was drawn out, the narrator of the audiobook not that good. When I was approximately in the middle, I considered dropping it entirely - in the end, I'd finished it, but kept the playback at 2x speed. It was a lot better, then.

bcca's review

Go to review page

3.0

Hmm. I'm wavering. I need to think about this one...

p0laris's review

Go to review page

2.0

Total let down. Review to come.

booksfitforadreamer's review

Go to review page

3.0

Meg Cabot's books have long been a staple in the YA genre. I mostly still read a few of her books out of my past love for her Mediator (or Haunted or whatever it's called now) series. Because although the writing is simplistic and often has the same type of narration and dialogue, Cabot is a reliably good storyteller. When reading the summary for this book, I was definitely intrigued. I love the Hades/Persephone mythology, and Greek mythology in general, so I wondered how it would be pulled off when brought into the modern world.

Did this book ultimately pull it off? I have to say...not quite. It was interesting, definitely, but a lot of it felt jumbled and predictable at points. And I understand that this is the first of a *trilogy*, but I think too many ends were left hanging to even be considered loose. Too many characters were flat, without having a real reason for the twists that they had, or reason for us to care about them.

Not to say that all of the characters fell short. Some of them definitely have potential for future development, and I'll be interested to see where the rest of the trilogy takes them. (Spoiler: I especially want to know more about the Furies. Why are they so vengeful, and why do they choose to go after the death deity rather than the reasons for which they died? Maybe I'm missing a key bit of mythology here, but I thought the relationship between John and the Furies was an interesting one, and could have been expanded upon.) Also, the name John? It felt odd. Maybe it's because I'm so used to fancy names in books, especially with elements of fantasy.

Maybe it's just me, but the timing felt like it dragged the story down. We're introduced to an "accident" and an "incident" in the beginning, and references for them are thrown around many, many times without divulging details. And then, at seemingly random intervals, we get thrown into the past to find out what happened. It jumbled the story, for me, and I would have rather had the flashback in the beginning--when they were first mentioned--rather than have the present story convoluted by references to these events that I know nothing about.

I think I tended to focus more on the negatives in this review. The fact it, the story kept me interested, despite its flaws, and I think I will check out the next in the series. Some things I'm looking forward to: more between Pierce and her parents. Her mom especially. (Spoiler: What Pierce will do now that she's trapped in the Underworld. Again. Except not dead this time, strangely?) And mostly, the Furies. I want to know much more about them. (Spoiler: And her grandmother--what's up with that? Definitely predictable from the small clues tossed around, but what happened with her real grandmother?) I don't know if I am really interested in finding out what's going on with Alex and the "A-wingers". It all seems a bit flat and cliché, but then, maybe there have just been one too many stories about high school. I'd rather skip out on it altogether. Oh, I like the cemetery sexton (am I the only one who didn't know that was a word?) as well, so I hope he makes a few appearances. Even if he does seem like the typical Giles of this universe. I think it was the hat. And the cover--it's gorgeous. I'm not ashamed to admit I am drawn to books with elaborate cover art. I'll be picking up Underworld when I see it on the shelves.

ros_hanlon's review

Go to review page

3.0

This one was a little harder to get into for me. I like the premise of the book - but the story itself seemed a little choppy and I found myself loosing track of what was happening occasionally. I do look forward to reading the next in the series though...

book_hoarding_dragon's review

Go to review page

2.0

On paper Abandon looks like to be a great read with a re-imagining of the Hades and Persephone or Pluto and Proserpina (the Roman counterparts). Mysterious Heroine and Hero (you need there to be some form of secrets or mystery with any character). Plus, Meg Cabot I was really excited for this read. (I've devoured her 1-800-where-r-u and Mediator Series, and her Avalon High and Insatiable book. Though, I disliked the heroine in Mediator I still liked her hero in that one. But the 1-800 was great and the twist in Avalon High was genius!) However, Abandon... the disappointments just kept coming....

I like stories that have intrigue and mystery. However, this book had TOO MUCH mystery and intrigue. There was:
1. The "accident"
2. The "incident" (which happened after the "accident" and is not to be confused with the "incident" really?)
3. The necklace.
4. And why hell the necklace is like a mood stone for other people or maybe it's just for her. Remember black means you're angry or it's below zero outside.
5. Why the hell do all the popular kids have white shining teeth that you need to have sunglasses on to avoid the glare?
6. What is Coffin Night?
7. Why does Alex hate all of the Popular kids?
8. What crime did Alex's dad (heroine's) commit that landed him in prison?
9. Who is the mysterious man that heroine's father keeps talking about that the mother is crushing on?
10. Besides of the whole human version of Hades who is John?

I'm sure there is more, but look at all this... this is all within ONE book. Over a series I can understand, but one book? Nuh-uh. There were too much in this story to really care about the heroine's dilemma's. After about 100 pages of every little thing being a shroud of mystery, I just didn't give a damn. If it wasn't for my tenacity to finish books I start (Sunshine by Robin McKinley one day I shall prevail!) I would've put this one on my 'sell list' after 100 pages.

Usually, with Cabot I can empathize or at least understand her characters but Pierce (the heroine) I just wanted to shake her with her inconsistency (as a previous reviewer has pointed out). One second she's going on about how she cares for people she loves and just does things for THEM. Yeah, then why prey tell does she do things that she knows that'll hurt them? Things that seem to be in her own self interest. Like hanging out with the rich snobs cause they're in the shade when her cousin made it clear that he intensely dislikes them. Oh, wait it's to protect her loved ones by finding evil. Huh? Really? Yeah, cause that is what life is ALL about finding evil. I couldn't help but roll my eyes everytime the character said that. Also, how she was with regard to her father irritated me. At times she actually seemed to care about him other times she was a snob to him. Excuse me, but if one of my parents were paying off a civil suit I'd try to be a little bit nicer to them. She came off as if she felt entitled about everything which I find to be not a good trait in a person.

John the "hero" of the story. I guess, is a centuries old angsty teenager? If that's not asking for trouble I don't know what is. I think part of the problem was that we saw so little interaction with him or to really get to know him.

Oh, and the whole "furies" thing? That really hit my pet peeve button. The whole signing on humans to help out with the deciding where souls go to (Elysian Field or Tartarus), point for you Cabot. HOWEVER, spirits that are essentially so evil and so bad that they go out and possess people as a way to hurt John? I wanted to snap my fingers, do the head slide, and say "oh no, you didn'" at Cabot. I am a mythology junkie and completely rewriting mythological deities, no. Though, yes, Cabot did get it right that the Furies do torment the evildoers in Tartarus. However the Erinyes (Furies or the Dirae which is their Roman counterpart) were much more than that. They were also goddess' of retribution or vengeance. Not only if a law was broken but if ethics were also broken. The Erinyes could punish with disease or with cases with patricide or matricide drive the killer insane. *gets off soapbox*

If instead Cabot had called them something else that would have been fine. Or even just called them shades, that would be fine too.

Also, one thing that really bugged me about this book: the heroine had studied Greek mythology how could she not know who Homer was?

So, yes, I was severely disappointed with this book. I was hoping for so much better. I wanted to give this book a 1 but for Cabot's track record I'm giving it a 2.

trishcoonce's review

Go to review page

3.0

I adore Meg Cabot, but this definitely wasn't my favorite book of hers. It was interesting and kept me entertained, yet I'm frustrated by the lack of what I felt like was enough of a story. I was left feeling like I read a book that was missing the last half. Which maybe this is what Cabot's intention was, because it is a trilogy and I do want to read the next book. I will be reading the next book because I'm not giving up on it yet!

hollylynna's review

Go to review page

3.0

You can' go wrong with Meg Ctabot and this book is no exception. I loved the way she took her time develing the story and shie keeps you waiting...what did happen to Pierce's friend and what the incident. It waz worth the wait.

veryreaderie's review

Go to review page

1.0

I came here to give a splintering review but I see quite a few people have already done so. I didn't think Pierce was as bad as some reviews are making her out to be, but she did ramble and wasn't that compelling as a character.

Mostly, I hated how the story didn't feel like it went anywhere. There was so much explanation about past events that events in the current timeline only took up a small portion of the book and didn't feel like a coherent whole. The party at the start of the book (and subsequent bike ride) felt like it went on forever because of all the exposition forced into those scenes.

Also, I'd like to note that I'm kind of tired of the omg-it's-an-abusive-relationship thread we get on for books like this. If I think back to what I wanted as a teen, I would have loved to have a guy obsessed with me (or I thought I would). These books are harmless wish-fulfillment and I don't think that's a bad thing. It's not like we form our concept of a healthy relationship from one single book, and in the meantime there are plenty of other books with great relationships. (I still think Tamora Pierce should be required reading for young teens.) Any young-girls-shouldn't-read-this sentiments make me incredibly nervous. Read MORE, not less.

Regardless, I was disappointed to find that this book doesn't do the Persephone myth justice. I've been looking for a good Persephone-story for so long... if anyone can recommend one to me I'd be much obliged. :) Doesn't have to be romantic--I'd love to read about Persephone escaping or getting revenge just as much as a romantic reinterpretation.

s8emd9's review against another edition

Go to review page

mysterious slow-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? No
  • Loveable characters? No
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

2.5


Expand filter menu Content Warnings