Reviews

Pretty Deadly, Vol. 3: The Rat by Emma Ríos, Kelly Sue DeConnick

theangrystackrat's review

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challenging dark mysterious fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

3.5

bkwrm1317's review

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dark fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes

4.0

The noir style of this one was more up my alley (I do enjoy the creators’ playing with different comic genres though, can’t lie). 

I also enjoyed their toying with the noir genre here re: Clara’s story. 

monique_rose's review

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adventurous dark emotional mysterious sad medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.5

novelerachavela's review

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adventurous challenging dark emotional informative mysterious reflective sad tense slow-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

kajalhalwa's review against another edition

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5.0

A wonderful continuation in an eerie, wise and perpetually gorgeous series. I'm glad I reread previous volumes to refresh myself of all the threads and arching messages, and to properly appreciate them.

sp1derfairy's review

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4.0

I had to read this book twice to really feel like I could review it it’s such a cool comic I love all of the imagery and the commentary it makes on noir and society in general.
I love the visual motif of obsession with butterflies because butterflies generally represent hope, and that mislead is soooo good I love it so much. The butterflies swarm the characters, swarm them with hope, making them obsessed. I also love the nature of obsession’s reaper as self-defeating. It’s quite cool how the reaper’s spell their own destruction. This definitely makes me think of the noir genre and the last bit at the end is fascinating. Forgiveness as a tool that can only be useful and truly exist in the face or in opposition of treachery. It’s so hard to think about forgiving something treacherous as not absolving them. I like how forgiveness frees the person, but not the one who hurt them. Or I guess maybe it does in a way. It doesn’t free them, but it opens a door, you can’t free someone without them wanting it too. Really cool stuff to think about as a whole. Also the line, “there’s no defeating shadows, there’s only walking towards the light”. gosh i love that. also ginny makes me sad, there’s two instances right after each other saying that rest and forgiveness are not “what she’s for” but i also see that ginny escapes the traditional bounds of her own identity as a reaper a bit in helping the guy (albeit for absolution of a sort). cool characters.

gabbyshriner's review against another edition

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adventurous challenging dark mysterious tense fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

4.0

kierli's review

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mysterious reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? No
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.5

econsidine's review against another edition

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4.5

Yes. Sometimes a bit too self-serious (the fact that my copy had some culture professor's analysis at the end didn't help) but they kind of earned it, so...