Reviews

The Hate You Give, by Angie Thomas

jessthebest123's review against another edition

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4.0

I didn't love the first half of this book but the second half was so good!

Chris and Maverick's dynamic is soooo funny.

The message behind this was so strong and powerful and it was beautifully done.

niteluna's review against another edition

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emotional hopeful informative inspiring sad fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

jessicraig's review against another edition

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4.0

I got chills reading this book. The most realistic fiction book I’ve ever read, and it gives such an important look into the perspective of what it’s like to grow up in America black. Starr is a picture of bravery & integrity that I loved!

givnuapeacesign's review against another edition

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5.0

I am a 51 year old white grandmother. I have been raised in and have always lived in an all white neighborhood. I teach at a school where the number of black children are similar to the Williamson Prep School highlighted in this novel. My parents never talked to me about what to do if I was pulled over or questioned by a policeman. I never talked to my children about the topic either. I have never been afraid of policeman. Officer Friendly and all... I have never been hungry, really hungry. The only time the lights went out was when I forgot to pay the bill. I've never been in a situation where I had to choose to pay the bill or feed my child. Never have I had to worry about medical care or go without insurance. I have always been able to buy homes, cars, major appliances on time installments. I've never held more than one job at a time. I do not know anyone who has been murdered. I only know one person who has had to be hospitalized from being beaten, and that was two white teens. I am white privilege.
This novel is astounding. It took me walking inside the brain, neighborhood, schools, fashion, loving relationships, fears of Starr. She faces more before breakfast every day than I will face my entire life. Angie Thomas has created a brilliant glimpse that every American should read, today. TODAY. The Hate U Give Little Infants Fucks Everyone. Thug Life via Tupac. Being beaten down, not believed, attacked by: authorities, family, friends, schools, society every single solitary second. This novel brings that into reality for those of us who cannot conceive it. I can only imagine how it would make those living it feel...what's the word... understood? validated? A hairbrush is NOT a gun. A neighborhood does not a criminal make, or does it... I struggle for words. I do know that this novel is true beyond any book review. I do know that the lifestyle of the characters within is survival, not a choice or a fashion statement. I do know that the danger is there and many times selling or using substances is the only means to cope with the poverty and hopelessness life presents every second. Yet I also know our lily white America has no desire to "get it." I know that every black man in America, EVERY BLACK MAN, including President Obama, has had to look over his shoulder, panic as a police car tails him, been followed in stores... I fear this will NEVER change in MY country. For is this America really the land of the free for those whose skin isn't white? Can this country be saved? Changed? I really don't see it happening. Yet those of us with white skin, the white privileged like ME, can at least TRY. We can in our own way try. We must try.

louiseb's review against another edition

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5.0

I would give this book a hell of a lot more that 5 stars, it gets a billion of them. This is probably one of the best books I've read in many many years. It was an incredible rollercoaster story that kept me gripped to the book and not wanting to put it down until I completed it. I even took it to work and read it in my lunch break.
Please please please people need to read this book.

thebookfangirl's review against another edition

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challenging emotional inspiring reflective medium-paced

5.0


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audiobookmel's review against another edition

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4.0

My review and an extended sample of the audiobook are posted at Hotlistens.com.

#4 Thomas’ debut novel, written as a reaction to the police shooting of Oscar Grant, includes drug use, profanity and sexual references, which are reasons it was challenged. It was also deemed “anti-cop,” according to the ALA.


So, I decided that I wanted to read a book for Banned Books Week, so I started looking through the list of the Top 11 Challenged Books of 2018 and this was on the list (at number 4, to be exact). Books are banned for a great many reasons. The Hate U Give is challenged because “banned and challenged because it was deemed ‘anti-cop,’ and for profanity, drug use, and sexual references”. While I disagree that this story is anti-police, I think it does portray the issues facing black communities and the police charged with protecting in those areas. Yes, there is also profanity and drug references and some sexual references. You could also “fault” it for gang violence. But I think all of these things make the story very real and relatable to teens today. I don’t think this book encourages any of the “negative” things that make it challenged. I feel it would help teens deal with these types of issues.

The Hate U Give follows the story of Star Carter. A teenage black girl who lives with one foot in the black community of Garden Heights and the mostly white prep school she goes to. When she goes to a party in Garden Heights, there is gun fire and she flees with an old, but estranged friend, a young black boy named Khalil. They are later pulled over by the cops, you can imagine where things go from there.

I really enjoyed this story, along with Star, her family and most of her friends. The Carters are a typical American family in that the parents want their kids’ lives to be better than their own. They are willing to do what they have to do to help make that happen, though her mother and father have different ideas on how to accomplish that better life.

I enjoyed watching the town come together when tragedy hits in more ways than one. It showed that even a town known for violence, the town is more than just the violence in it. There are people who are really trying to bring the community up and make it a safe place for people to live and work.

I liked seeing how Star struggled with the decision to come forward and speak about what happened to her and Khalil. Not just to talk to the police, but the grand jury and later publicly. Think about the strength needed for a sixteen year old girl to do this. I’m not sure I could and I’m forty-two.

I think the biggest takeaway for me (which I kinda knew, but this shined new light on it) was how the media portrayed Khalil. They focused all of their energy on every mistake the boy had made in his life. Sure, there were things that weren’t good, but nothing that should’ve cost him his life. I loved how Star talks about Kalil, the boy that she grew up with and tried to change the message that he wasn’t a thug.

I’m sure that I’m reading this book from a different perspective than people who can more closely relate to this story in their own lives, but I also think that this book should be read by people of all ages, races and backgrounds. It really makes you think about things, from another person’s perspective.

I think that this is a book that everyone should read. It is 100% worth the hype that it’s gotten. I’m not a huge reader of YA, and especially not contemporary YA (most YA, when I do read it, is speculative fiction). This book doesn’t read like a YA. Yeah, there’s some teenage angst, but that isn’t the driver of the story like some other YAs that I’ve read. I think you can be of any age and really connect with this story.

Narration
It is no secret that I’m a huge Bahni Turpin fan. I’ve been listening to her narration for a long time now. She is a narrator that, any time I see her name, I stop to see if the book sounds like something I’m interested in, because I just love her narration so much. She’s no different here. She really brings out the passion in the people of this story. You can really feel their pain, hatred, love and more. If you’ve never listened to her before, I highly recommend her work.

littlestar2911's review against another edition

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challenging dark emotional hopeful informative inspiring sad tense fast-paced

5.0

books4days's review against another edition

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5.0

This book came about after the author tweeted a publisher asking if he thought there was a place for a YA novel inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement. If the success of this book is anything to go off of, the answer is a resounding YES.

I had heard great things about this novel before I read it (author endorsements and even an article in Entertainment Weekly) and it delivered on all I had heard and then some. I wasn't expecting the book to be as compulsively readable (I read it all in a single day), entertaining, and relatable as I found it to be.

Everything about this book was just so well done. One of the primary aspects of the character of Starr Carter is her constant code-switching between her environment and peers, whether she's in Garden Heights (her neighborhood, afflicted by poverty, gangs, and drugs) or Williamson (her predominantly white, affluent school). Reading Starr's internal monologues when she has to balance what she feels are two sides of herself was a highlight of the book. I also liked how authentically and completely within the world of a contemporary high-schooler this book was. Harry Potter, Tumblr, the Jonas Brothers, Fresh Prince of Bel-Air -- Starr references them all.

To conclude: Please go read this book. I (and many others -- this book is seriously and rightfully very popular) highly recommend it.

danibeliveau's review against another edition

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3.0

This is an important book for people to read, especially young people. It is a fictionalized retelling of many highly politicized recent events, particularly police brutality and Black Lives Matter-style protests, from the perspective of a high school girl who finds herself in the middle of it all. Though the narrator's voice is genuinely, believably teenaged and often hilarious, I struggled to maintain interest in the "young-adult" voice. I wish a book like this had been published fifteen years ago, but then again, this story is very much a distillation of current events, and I'll be curious to see how well it holds up against the test of time.