Reviews

A Wrinkle in Time, by Madeleine L'Engle

greyscarf's review against another edition

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4.0

Meg Murry is in a difficult phase. She feels constantly at odds with the people around her, her father has been missing for months, & her baby brother Charles Wallace seems to be privy to a secret plan with the eccentric Mrs. Whatsit, a newly arrived transient who's been stealing the neighbor's sheets. On top of that, another oddball named Calvin has inexplicably found friendship & comfort with the irrepressible Murrys. Meg, Charles Wallace, & Calvin are brought together by three fantastical beings in a quest to find Mr. Murry that will take them beyond the stars.

So, confession time, I knew absolutely nothing about this book, despite it being a touchstone of children's literature. But once I opened the book, I soon found myself absorbed in Meg's trials (both practical & supernatural) & struggles to understand the quicksilver changes she observes. I did vaguely know about L'Engle's Christian concerns & was impressed by her outlining Meg's struggle to embrace willing compassion. The drama of Wrinkle occurs just as much in the interior of her characters as well as outside them. And I now do wish I had read the series sooner.

The end of the story comes quickly & definitely left me wanting more. After seeing the struggle against the Black Thing & knowing there is much more to be done, I get that L'Engle has many more books to refine her overall goal. But the rescue, return, & reunion of the Murrys takes place so immediately, it's hard to catch up & accept the end of the story. Onto the next book!

dotsonapage's review against another edition

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3.0

I've read this book several times, first when I was about eight and most recently sometime in middle school. It's a great interplanetary adventure and meg is a wonderfully unassuming heroine. I still sort of wish I had a little brother like Charles Wallace and that there was a whole sequel devoted to the Beasts. And this is the book that began my long-time love of Madeleine L'Engle. Go read it if you haven't already.

joceraptor's review against another edition

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5.0

This was probably the first book that really got me into reading. My aunt gave me (what I assume was) her copy for Christmas one year, and it was the 1976 edition I picked up to reread today, at least a decade after the last time I'd read it. Some of the magic has faded since childhood, and I had completely forgotten just how short and quick this was, but it will forever be a favorite.
Meg took a batch of forks from the drawer and turned them over and over, looking at them. "I'm all confused again."
"Oh, so 'm I," Calvin said gaily. "But now at least I know we're going somewhere."

I have high hopes for the movie adaptation coming out next year.

theredbooks's review against another edition

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5.0

Just amazing. This is my first re-read of A Wrinkle in Time and my first time reading it in English. I especially loved Meg's character development thorough out the story, she has always been smart but her development from being an angry delinquent to a wise, understanding, and loving girl is very nice to read. This book is still up there in my favorite books of all time list. I don't know what was it back then that made the translated book so good and magical because translated work is never my favorite, with only few exception. I definitely going to continue on with the series and hopefully read the rest of Madeleine's books.
This is the 5th book that i finished for the 2018 BookTube-A-Thon. The reading challenge for this book is to read a book with the same hat all the time. Loved the book, hated the challenge.

courtney_mm's review against another edition

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I wish I had read this younger because I feel like I would have appreciated the magic and fantasy of it more. When I read it, instead of being captivated by the fantasy of it, I was like at what it meant. And this book meant so much! It shows people, especially kids, that it's GOOD to be different. That sameness is evil and we should embrace and love our differences. It also showed that it's ok to be scared and afraid, but still be brave. And that kids are way more powerful than the think, that adults aren't the saviors we think they are. I loved the part about the artists fighting the dark thing because it showed that through creativity and uniqueness, it's possible to fight the evil that is everyone being exactly the same. I think everyone should read this when they're young, and again as adults.

kayciedoom's review against another edition

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adventurous dark emotional hopeful mysterious tense fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.0

meganelph's review against another edition

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5.0

Jack, my 9 year old, found this to be a very timely book, in that IT reminded him of Donald Trump. Spoiler Alert: Love wins.

ireney5's review against another edition

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4.0

3.5 stars
The most exciting part of this book was the middle chunk, when the kids first interact with the horrifyingly uniform people of Camazotz (reminded me of a lot of [b:1984|40961427|1984|George Orwell|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1532714506l/40961427._SX50_.jpg|153313], actually, and made me sit up with sudden interest) and the subsequent move to Ixchel and the nice-but-unfortunately-faceless-and-hairy beings over there.

The beginning was slow and a bit tedious, and I thought I was going to give the book just 1 or 2 stars at that point. The ending was very much deus ex machina (Meg shows up to save Charles Wallace and is able to because of the power of her love, yawn, and the book ends within a couple of pages of that anticlimactic showdown) .

Kudos to this book for its sheer creativity and originality of thought. Were it published now, I'd be a lot less impressed, but for a book of the early 1960s, it certainly deserves the amount of recognition it's received over the years. The tesseract, the centaur-like true forms of Mrs Whatsit and the others, the infallible nature of the Murry parents, the Meg's greatest strengths are her biggest flaws (her impatience, temper, disrespect for authority, etc) all make this book stand apart from the rest.
(Also, random, but I love that Meg's mom, Dr. Murry, is literally a genius scientist who is also really freaking hot. Beauty and brains can and do go together, and it was just a nice detail that she's such a brilliant scientist but is also gorgeous. You'd think that at this time, books would characterize genius scientist women as sacrificing their femininity, and I believe a lot of books did.)

I'm glad that while it took me many years of owning this book, I finally got myself to read it. I might even pick up the sequel.

*Read for 2020 Genre Challenge, July: Time Travel*

crunden's review against another edition

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5.0

I'm annoyed at myself for not having read this sooner. So lovely <3

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abs171910's review against another edition

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4.0

What an inexplicable pleasure it was to time travel – not in the same way as the Murrys, of course – back to when I first read this book over a decade ago, using my original copy. I remembered bits of the story of course, but unlike several other books I haven't read since childhood, all of this came flooding back to me. As I turned the pages I could recall the feeling of sitting in my elementary school classes, curious for what came next.

I decided to pick this up because the movie's coming out and Ava Duvernay is a godsend. I've decided that really, I can read quickly enough to justify rereading books that I wouldn't normally. And now I'm psyched. Although I'm confused about why the Happy Medium is always cast as a male. I believe the pronoun "SHE" is used. Male-washing?

I love the female characters so much in this, and I don't think I appreciated them as much before my real takeoff as a feminist in university. Meg may not be traditionally intelligent, but she is tough and goes on a real journey to pump up some self-esteem that she really deserves. (The school is very interesting because I think it briefly explores how unaccommodating educational centers can be for "non-traditional" learners.) Her mother has two PhDs, and pretty much everyone who guides her and her three male companions are female.

The afterward in this edition makes it very clear that L'Engle really knew what she was talking about, understanding scientific principles before they were widely known. (I can't believe this was written in 1962, on several counts!) But what really struck me is how EPISCOPALIAN this was. As a cradle Episcopalian who is currently struggling my dad keeps trying to let me know how cool Episcopalianism is, and he's not wrong. L'Engle was apparently a devout Episcopalian (besides being a very magical person) and this book really shows it. There is talk of God, both directly and indirectly, but also of science, and how the two work really well together. Science, as I interpret L'Engle's meaning, is a beautiful thing that comes out of God. And it is love that wins the day over hate – although of course our faults are just as important to the existence and progress of humankind, as we see through Meg and her really, justifiable, anger.

Something small I noticed this time around: I figured that the way Mrs. Who and Mrs. Which talked were just gimmicks, and in a way maybe they are, but really they're a deeper characterization of their extraterrestrial natures. Mrs. Whatsit is (comparatively) young, but she is chosen for the mission because of her ability to communicate in English. Mrs. Who and Mrs. Which are chosen for different reasons, and therefore it makes sense that they have more trouble communicating.

I'm not sure if I want to pick up the next book in the series. This one is just so magical. I've stuck with the first book before out of fear. But I also have another goal to get to this year, and I remember struggling to read the next book when I was younger. So I guess we'll see. But this book, as it is, is near perfect.