tien's review against another edition

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5.0

I don't know all the author contributors in this essay collection but wow, I'm totally mind blown by each and all of their willingness & openness to share their thoughts (some very private and others in continuing their fight for what they believe in), their courage and resilience throughout each unique challenges they faced, and above all, their generosity in encouraging and sharing the hope they had and have. All are authors who write Young Adult novels and while quite a few of their stories relate to their youth, this collection is relevant today to everyone everywhere. I highly recommend it for your next read.

missusb21's review against another edition

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5.0

Moving. Every story spoke to me.

bookiesncookies's review against another edition

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4.0

There were some stories that will stick with me. Like David Levithan's at the Women's March, Libba Bray surviving a car crash immediately after high school, Marie Lu's family leaving Communist China after the Tiananmen Square protests and continuing to protest in America, Nicola & David Yoon's struggles of racism within their own family, Gayle Forman finding courage to continue to travel and live without fear immediately after 9/11 (hit differently while reading through a similar collective experience like this pandemic), Atia Abawi's about not letting assholes have any say or influence on your decisions, Alex London dancing with his friend wearing a dress to their junior prom and how it helped him come out a year later, Howard Bryant sharing "Find the people who take an interest in your success. Spend time with them. Learn from them," Romina Garber not letting labels as an immigrant take away her "infinite potential," Renee Ahdieh not "chahmuh" (grin and bear it). Aisha Saeed defining what a true apology is and how it impacted her as a Muslim American after 9/11, Julie Murphy sharing how her family had their home foreclosed while she was graduating high school and how she can find home with the family she's hand-picked, and finally Jason Reynolds & Brendan Kiely talking about the hopes of young people they saw while on tour for All-American Boys.

The fact that I.W. Gregorio and James Dashner were included leaves a bad taste in my mouth based on Gregorio's book that was transphobic, homophobic, and had characters outed without their permission and Dashner who was accused of sexual harassment and dropped from his publisher for it (just to be picked up by another one).

greenlivingaudioworm's review against another edition

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4.0

"The truth is, we never really get fixed; instead, we try to make peace, daily, with who and what we are. We learn to embrace the glorious, imperfect whole rather than punishing ourselves because of our flawed parts." -Before and After by Libba Bray

This anthology of essays and short stories all center on the theme of hope. This collection was pulled together after the 2016 election and published in February 2018, a time when many of us needed hope. I had never heard of this until @thetownieteacher recommended it on Instagram this summer. Surprise, surprise, I took much longer than the allotted time to finish reading this collection of essays.

Some of the essays were fantastic ([a:Libba Bray|2526|Libba Bray|https://images.gr-assets.com/authors/1206563678p2/2526.jpg], [a:Nic Stone|13525503|Nic Stone|https://images.gr-assets.com/authors/1473479285p2/13525503.jpg], and [a:Atia Abawi|7228730|Atia Abawi|https://images.gr-assets.com/authors/1475509029p2/7228730.jpg]) while others didn't quite pull me in the way I wanted them to. Regardless, this is a beautiful collection of essays centered around a topic that so often we want to write about but simply don't know how. A few of the essays I could see working into my classroom curriculum, which was the whole point of the summer reading, and some of them are too near and dear to my heart to pick apart with a room full of 12 and 13 year olds. This is a beautiful collection of essays and one that I am glad to have read, even if it did take me a solid four months to get through.

readingintheflx's review against another edition

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hoping to finish at some point...

_booklover_16's review against another edition

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challenging hopeful inspiring lighthearted

4.0

hawkrose18's review against another edition

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5.0

4.5/5 stars

I really enjoyed this anthology and am now wanting to just go and pick up all of the works from all of the authors that wrote essays from this book. I have read from many of the authors before and own books most of the rest of the authors that I am now pushing up my TBR because I throughly enjoyed the authors' writing. I am all about hope and so this book was right up my alley and I am so glad that it did not disappoint.

decklededgess's review against another edition

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4.0

I'm marking this as read even though I haven't finished it. I read all the essays from authors that I REALLY wanted to read so I think I've exhausted the content that interested me. I had originally planned on giving this 3 stars because I felt like my disinterest in reading other chapters was something I needed to count towards the intrigue of this book but that's utter bullshit and really unfair. Every essay I read was 5 stars but I haven't finished the book. So I'll wait till I finish the entire thing to give it an overall rating.

[edit: I decided fuck it this deserves a positive rating at least so I'm gonna give it 4 stars]

In terms of content, this book was great. Very timely and very inspiring. It did exactly what it set out to do which was inspire hope in this shitty shitty time. The essays take a long time to process tbh because they're so heavy in their message and hit so many emotions so friggin hard but they also really make you think. This was a really fantastic idea and it's very clear that the authors and Dr. Rose Brock poured their hears and souls into this anthology.

J*mes D*shner has a chapter in here but that's bc the assault allegations weren't out yet so can't fault the author and publisher for that. I refuse to read his chapter though.

As for trigger warnings I guess the aforementioned predator is one, motor accident, depression, islamophobia, racism, microaggressions against poc and immigrants, and more definitely but I haven't read everything so idk what they are.

amdame1's review against another edition

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3.0

Short stories about finding hope in the hard times A relevant collection for this time period where we all need some hope, some light, some encouragement. One potential problem if this is supposed to be NF is that the very first story by David Levithan, he says: "it's fiction, but it's not really fiction"

As with all short story collections, it varies, depending on the author and the story.

sydmae's review against another edition

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4.0

Some of the essays are better than others, but there are a few that are really worth sticking around for (Angie Thomas, Jason Reynolds, obviously).