Reviews

Flight of the Puffin, by Ann Braden

lauralynnwalsh's review

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5.0

I don't often give books a 5 star rating and this one is probably just a bit under that for me, but I rounded it up to 5 stars because, even as an adult, I felt it held significance for me. People don't have to do something newsworthy or groundbreaking or even great in order to be amazing and worth appreciating. I have been told this before and, I suppose I believed it, but this book made me FEEL it. There is a bit of suspension of disbelief that is necessary for all of the connections to work out, but I didn't really mind, because it still felt good. And she didn't tie up all threads neatly at the end - there was enough to satisfy your mind, but not too much so as to be completely fairy tale ending. Worthwhile for me.

sydneyk's review

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inspiring medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes

4.0

darthchrista's review

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5.0

“I thought I could figure it out with T, but T qhad to explain it to me. It isn't that hard to understand if you're willing to listen.” 161
A gentle book to begin discussion on non-binary questions. Have a kiddo wondering what that is, are you as an adult wondering? This is a gentle book to start a conversation. And you’ll probably be inspired to send a postcard or learn more about puffins or something else amazing! To paraphrase @sharonsaysso Reading to understand does not obligate you to agree. (Actual quote is Listening to understand doesn’t obligate you to agree).

techielibgrl's review

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5.0

This book is fantastic. It gave me so many feelings. The first character we are introduced to comes from a family of bullies and she seen as a bully in her school even though that is not the identity that she wants. Kids who have been pigeon-holed into being what their older siblings/parents were like in school will really identify. It really highlights how important it is to take each student for themselves not the family they come from. The book is a loose collection of stories that lightly connect (but not neatly) in the journey of a homeless man, bullied student, activist, and a bully who really does not want to be a bully. The bully actually starts writing inspirational messages and leaves them around her town. I do not want to give it away but these message impact all of their lives in unexpected ways. It really is a book that everyone should read.

From the synopsis that really gives good insight into the book: Four kids. Four different lives. And then… one card with a message of hope takes flight and starts a chain reaction, helping each kid summon the thing they need, whether it’s bravery, empathy, or understanding.

jdanforth's review

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4.0

Do you know how many triangles you are making with your body right now?

mldavisreads's review

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challenging emotional inspiring reflective

5.0

Middle grade contemporary realistic fiction.  This story focuses on four different characters, two male, one female, and one non-binary. They are all dealing with a lot, trying to be who they are and be loved for it. Vincent is a science geek born to an artist, Libby feels unloved by her parents and seeks comfort in her art, Jack is mourning the death of his younger brother and takes on a brotherly role to young Joe at their rural schoolhouse, and T would rather live on the streets than face their non-supportive mother.  Watching the storylines connect and seeing how these kids built each other up was beautiful.  This book shed some light on some of those stories we don't always get to see-- the kids who have a hard time at home, dealing with distant parents who don't see how their children shine. A tribute to the power of a random act of kindness and a reminder that everyone shines in different ways.

kat_fisch85's review

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challenging emotional hopeful inspiring reflective sad medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes

3.5

angisnowflake's review

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4.0

This was a very beautiful book. It tells the story of four different children and how their very different life’s get connected.

It’s a lot about self acceptance but also being open towards other.

Like the authors first book I love this a lot and absolutely recommend it especially for children/teens.

amykuc's review

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challenging hopeful inspiring reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? It's complicated
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

4.75

Flight of the Puffin has been sitting on my TBR pile since it was published. My loss to have not read it sooner. The book follows four kids who are having a hard time navigating life at the moment. Libby is wrongly characterized as a bully at school. Vincent lives with daily bullying. Jack tries to help his rural school stay open but ends up being mistakenly labeled as a bigot. And T is living on the streets since their mother refused to accept their declaration of being transgendered. Through the book, all of the kids develop new understandings through some tough situations. This book deals with some difficult topics, but with grace and hope. 

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themagic8's review

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5.0

this may end up being my favorite read of the year!!