Reviews tagging Racism

Hurricane Summer, by Asha Bromfield

19 reviews

onemorepagecrew's review against another edition

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emotional reflective sad medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

Hurricane Summer by Asha Bromfield is a debut contemporary YA novel that held my heart captive while I read it.  In it, we meet Tilla and her sister who are traveling from their home in Canada to their dad’s home in Jamaica.  During their annual trip to visit their father, we see Tilla grappling with their strenuous relationship while finding her way with family and friends in Jamaica.  In the background, the island is preparing for a hurricane and the potential destruction it will bring.  
 
Coming-of-age stories are one of my favorite types of YA fiction and this story delivered depth and heart.  It directly confronts colorism, classism, sexism, and generational stories of a family with vulnerability. The biggest thing I take away from this book is how I felt while reading it.  I was attached to Tilla and there were times that my heart was broken, and others when I was frustrated and protective, but also times where I deeply felt her joy and self-discovery.  It’s such a well-rounded look at the complex emotions of young adults. 
 
The author did a wonderful job allowing the reader to be uncomfortable with how Tilla was treated while giving space for her family and their stories, too.  It’s a hard balance to strike and she did it very well.  I also really enjoyed that the Patois language in the book and the glossary of terms included, it added so much. 
 
If you enjoy coming-of-age YA then I strongly recommend you read this book – and do it when you feel ready for an emotional pummeling.  I loved meeting Tilla and if there was a sequel that takes place in her adulthood, I’d sprint to the bookstore for it.  
 
Content warnings: Abandonment, Sexual violence, Domestic abuse, Colorism, Classism, Sexism, Infidelity 

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tayahmarie's review

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adventurous challenging emotional reflective sad tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

 Tilla, the young brown skin girl from Canada who is trying so hard to connect with her homeland, Jamaica, and calm the storm within her by making sense of her complicated relationship with her father. Wow. I saw SO much of myself in Tilla that it was scary low key, lol. Her character truly transported me back to my own girlhood and that made this reading experience even more interesting. That said, I became attached and grew a fierce protectiveness over her very quickly. Unlike most YA books, I didn’t have to keep reminding myself that Tilla was young, because so many of the things she said and did, I might’ve said and did, too when I was her age. She got a lot of grace from me. Whenever she went through one traumatic/hurtful thing, it’s like something else was lurking around the corner, and my heart broke for her in so many different ways and so many different times. 

I also wanted to note that the exploration of Black girlhood and Black fatherhood was done so well. I feel like there aren’t that many books or even works on the direct impact and correlation when it comes to the two. Tilla had so many complex feelings when it came to Tyson and the way in which she tried to navigate those feelings could resonate with so many Black girls and women. Tilla’s final conversation with him hit different, because sometimes all you can do is simply forgive and try to move on as best as you can.

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greenlivingaudioworm's review against another edition

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challenging emotional sad medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.5


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daphne__02's review

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challenging dark inspiring reflective sad tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

5.0

Amazing plot. Talking about her relationship with her mostly absent dad. How it feels to be a stranger when u visit a struggling country and you’re well off compared to them. The love and hate relationship with people in Jamaica and their secrets that they keep within them. I cried as fuck so I loved it obviously.

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thelovelylibrarylady's review against another edition

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adventurous dark emotional reflective tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

4.0

Bromfield, an author of Afro-Jamaican descent, wrote this beautiful story set in Jamaica. While it is not the main focus, I learned a lot about the island and Jamaican culture by reading this novel. Hurricane Summer is a bit of a slow starter. I found the early chapters to be a little boring, but once the plot picks up, it doesn't stop. Many heavy topics are addressed in this novel including (but not limited to) colorism, sexual assault, the sexualization of girls of color, and classism. I would recommend this book to others, but also make sure that they were ready to tackle such an emotionally taxing story before they started this one.
(PUB DATE: AVAILABLE NOW)
(I received a digital copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed above are my own.)

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bookswithmybulldog's review

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emotional tense fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? No
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0


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betweentheshelves's review

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challenging dark emotional medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.5

I have mixed feelings about this book. On the one hand, this is a story that needs to be told. It's authentic, the voice feels real, and the incorporation of the Patois language makes it really unique. However, Tilla's story isn't the easiest to read. She goes through abuse, bullying, name calling. Your heart aches for her. There isn't much to balance out all of the negative stuff Tilla goes through, and I wish there was more showing a balanced side of Jamaica. 

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kerrygetsliterary's review

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dark emotional reflective sad tense fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0


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mrsmiralda's review

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emotional sad tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

This book was incredible. I absolutely loved reading this, and it also hurt so so much.

Be warned, there’s plenty of triggers in this one: sexual, physical, verbal, and domestic abuse vividly described, abortion, death, loss & grief, bad parenting, defamation of character, experiencing a Hurricane, colorism and racial bias

Tilla’s story is one that resonated with me in ways I didn’t imagine. While my dad was never as emotionally disconnected as Tilla’s he still left our family to lead a different life. That hit home with me and her experience wondering why she wasn’t good enough for her father. This book also reminded me of the summer I spent in Cuba when I was 16, my first time returning after having emigrated to the United States. My experience there was similar to Tilla’s in terms of a summer fling and some culture shock. It’s interesting to be in your motherland and feel so disconnected from it that you start to really wonder where you belong.

Though this book was far more dramatic and climactic than my life, it hit close to my heart and I will treasure it forever. Also listening to patois on audiobook was an amazing experience and I was amazed at how much of it I naturally understood. Sometimes I was like, “Tilla, come on, that phrase is easy to understand!” But maybe that’s just me 🤷🏻‍♀️ 

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cortnereads's review

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Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for a free e-arc copy in exchange for an honest review.

I understand that this book is an own voices book, set in Jamaica, and that the author did their best trying to convey their love for Jamaica but I DNF'd at 47%. 

Hurricane Summer seemed like a promising story with the blurb and I was very excited to read it. I was engaged in the story of Tilla and Mia from the start. They have a strained relationship with their Jamaican father and he invites them to Jamaica to spend the summer with him. This story is based on the country with poverty and racism. It was full of verbal, physical, emotional, and mental abuse. I tried to continue the story but as her "love interest" started to heat up, I could not find myself interested in reading anything more. I did not feel as though the story was actually going any where. Not much had happened since the beginning except for finding out a little more about other characters. Tilla and Mia were never introduced to the "wonderful" sides of Jamaica that the author continued to talk about. They were taken to a river that Tilla described as beautiful but other than that, there time so far was in the poverty stricken country side of Jamaica. I could never figure out what the main problem was in the story and where the plot was leading us. I feel like there were so many different ways it could take us but I got to a point where I could not longer bring myself to finish it.

I am happy that I was given a chance to read this book, but unfortunately, it was a no for me.

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