Reviews

Americanah, by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

bloom9159's review against another edition

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4.0

such an interesting view of the USA! this slow-burn love story really centers on the experiences of immigrants, what it means to be Black, and how the perspectives of others can define us if we’re not careful.

kateegreenlee's review against another edition

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5.0

oh wow oh wow oh wow oh wow oh wow.

catherineofalx's review against another edition

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5.0

A delight I wish were even longer.

_dfogz's review against another edition

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4.0

Might have taken me a while to read but was definitely worth it. Entertaining, yet expanded my view of the world.

However, wish there was more blog posts!

tabbi's review against another edition

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  • Plot- or character-driven? Character

4.5

notesfromjulia's review

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3.0

3.5

I overall really enjoyed this book and following the characters over the course of the years. I totally recommend reading it and I’m glad I did. The narrator of the audiobook, Adjoa Andoh, is great as well and I can really recommend you check it out if you struggle with the physical book like I did (some books just really work better for me if the story is told to me).
I really liked Obinze and I wished we would have had more time with him, Ifemelu was harder for me to connect to but I still think she is a well-developed and interesting character, very stubborn at times but also inspiringly confident. That makes her a very strong protagonist and since the book is extremely character driven, that was really great.
What was my problem with the book was that it felt very drawn out. There were many scenes with gatherings of friends/family (dinners with friends etc.) and during these the political views and attitudes of the people were discussed. That was often very interesting and never shied away from unpopular opinions, I just felt like it took up way too much of the book, making it feel a little bit messy and repetitive. I enjoyed Ifemelu‘s blog entries at times, at others I couldn’t really connect or agree with what she‘d say (there was one specific thing that irked me). Overall, it touches on many important topics that you get to see from the lense of very interesting characters.
I wish there would have been more actual story about the main characters and the ones they were closest to, especially with Obinze. The cast is big but a lot of the characters only play minor roles, so it was not easy to get a great impression of some of them. Still, I think it made the book more authentic because obviously people have complex social connections.
Nevertheless, Adichie has a great writing style, the prose was beautiful, and when the book had it’s great moments, they were really really really good. The more dense parts are worth it and the ending was very well done. I‘ll be sure to check out her other novels as well – her non-fiction is still my favorite though.

animee's review against another edition

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4.0

Never have I related so much to a book before. I wish this had come out when I was in college. I'm always wary of employing the stereotypical "African experience", but I'm well aware that stereotypes do stem from a place of truth. So if you're an African who's lived abroad (especially in the U.S) for any amount of time, read this book.
Read this book to lay your demons to rest.

(Some parts came off a little too "Carefree-Black-Naturalista-Social-Justice-Tumblerite", which I'm totally here for, but this is supposed to be a novel, not a blog...anyway that didn't ruin the novel for me, so it's all good)

sofasalazar8's review against another edition

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dark emotional funny hopeful inspiring reflective sad tense fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

5.0

dzibmoni's review against another edition

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2.0

1.5

I don't know very well how to express my feelings about this book.
First, the writing is phenomenal, I expected that, I have read other books by her, I have seen her interviews and lectures, I know she is a very good writer.
In what I have seen previously, I have always liked the way she talks about differences in cultures, feminism and racism
So, what was my problem with Americanah? the way it was "sold".

Ifemelu and Obinze are young and in love when they depart military-ruled Nigeria for the West. Beautiful, self-assured Ifemelu heads for America, where despite her academic success, she is forced to grapple with what it means to be black for the first time. Quiet, thoughtful Obinze had hope to join her, but with post-9/11 America closed to him, I have instead plunges into a dangerous, undocumented life in London. Fifteen years later, they meet in a newly democratic Nigeria, and reignite their passion-for each other and for their homeland.

I was expecting a novel about two people and yes, being this author I knew it would include talks about racism and feminism, but for me this was completely an opinion book.
I felt that I did not know any of the characters, or rather I only knew one side of them. Ifemelu throughout the story complained about certain behaviors, criticized, seemed never to be happy anywhere. Obinze, this story is not about him, it's mostly about his impact on Ifemelu's life.
When I started the book I was really enjoying it, but afterwards the dialogue became repetitive and as I said, it stopped being a novel, each chapter that passed I already knew that it was going to deal with a different topic of racism.
And the worst thing is that, that would have been fine, a book about observations about racism, something like what she did in Dear Ijeawele for feminism, although more extensive and elaborate and oh I would have read it with pleasure.
But inserting unnecessary characters and practically no plot, for me, wasn't the way to do it.

naitasia's review against another edition

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3.0

I didn’t like the beginning or the end, but I liked the middle.