Reviews

Invisible Cities, by Italo Calvino

h_berry0410's review against another edition

Go to review page

inspiring mysterious reflective relaxing medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? N/A
  • Strong character development? No
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? It's complicated
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

5.0

pavram's review against another edition

Go to review page

5.0

"It is not the voice that commands the story: it is the ear."

Kublaj Kan, car u sopstvenom, nepoznatom carstvu, stanovnik svih gradova; Marko Polo, trgovac u tudjem carstvu, stanovnik jednog jedinog grada - Venecije; Pisac koji spaja dva sveta, dva junaka koji možda i nisu zaista tu; i pedeset i pet gradova izmedju: zapisa uspomena, razmišljanja i osećanja, gradovi u svetu i svetovi u gradu, gradovi kao nove knjige, ali i one stare, pročitane. Pedeset i pet vinjeta napisanih rukom pesnika, jer Kalvino je beskonačno poetičan i ništa manje inteligentan u svojim opisima, i knjiga od sto pedeset stranica, a biblijskih razmera. Idealna za pusto ostrvo, jer može da se čita iznova i iznova i iznova i da uvek bude novi prijatelj, stari poznanik.

5+

hellochildren's review against another edition

Go to review page

4.0

With cities, it is as with dreams: everything imaginable can be dreamed, but even the most unexpected dream is a rebus that conceals a desire, or its reverse, a fear.

"Isidora, therefore, is the city of his dreams, with one difference. The dreamed-of city contained him as a young man; he arrives at Isidora in his old age. In the square there is the wall where the old men sit and watch the young go by; he is seated in a row with them. Desires are already memories"

"Every time I describe a city I am saying something about Venice."

"You reach a moment in life, when among the people you have known, the dead outnumber the living. And the mind refuses to accept more faces, more expressions: on every new face you encounter, it prints the old forms, for each one it finds the most suitable mask...Perhaps Adelma is the city where you arrive dying and where each finds again the people he has known."

The inferno of the living is not something that will be; if there is one, it is what is already here, the inferno we live everyday, that we form by being together.

==

Some fav and notable cities:
Diomira - envy
Isidora - old and young
Zora - unchanging
Zenobia - desires
Euphemia :) - by the fireplace
Sophronia - circus 
Eutropia - diff lives
Ersilla - strings
Leandra - tiny species in homes
Baucis -  above the cloud
Adelma - faces of the dead
Eusapia - land of the dead and the living
Leonia - daily refashioning
Irene - diff names 

scf2ke's review against another edition

Go to review page

3.0

It’s not hitting me yet. Will try again soon

aliceshed's review against another edition

Go to review page

adventurous challenging inspiring reflective slow-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? N/A
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? It's complicated
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

4.75

billturner's review against another edition

Go to review page

funny inspiring lighthearted mysterious reflective medium-paced

4.0

chiminelson's review against another edition

Go to review page

adventurous reflective slow-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? N/A
  • Strong character development? No
  • Loveable characters? No
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

3.5

spacestationtrustfund's review against another edition

Go to review page

4.0

bro if you don't shut the fuck up i'm literally going to decree a stately pleasure dome

I do love a good story where the landscape is the real protagonist.

During a 50-year career as a translator, William Weaver translated the bulk of Umberto Eco's works and almost all of Italo Calvino's, as well as many other Italian authors, Italian poetry, and opera libretti. He was an ambulance driver in Italy during WWII, then lived primarily in Italy after the end of the war, meeting and befriending many of Italy's leading authors and intellectuals during the late 1940s and through the 1950s. His translation is elegant, eloquent, and excellent; his mastery of the language, evident. I highly recommend it as second only to the original Italian.

cmccafe's review against another edition

Go to review page

5.0

A strange eschatology

elizafiedler's review against another edition

Go to review page

5.0

I read this immediately after finishing Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer. What a brain shock! The two books form a stark and peculiar juxtaposition. But many of the things I love about Calvino's book are things that it shares with Kimmerer's. It is concerned with the relationships between humans and their environment, humans and time, humans and imagination, humans and material culture.