Reviews

Foul Is Fair, by Hannah Capin

rbielbs's review against another edition

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4.0

Whoa. That was a very dark tale of revenge.

epilieaspiechick's review against another edition

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2.0

My full review can be found on the Epilie Aspie Chick blog!

Thank you to St. Martin's Press for providing the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

There's dark tales and then there is THIS BOOK. In all seriousness, the story told here takes thing to such a from place that I found a bitter taste in my mouth and a need to read faster to get the uncomfortable experience done sooner. It may be my disposition or possibly the plot holes I found in how elements unraveled, but this one left me unsettled in the wrong kind of way. 

ellareads's review against another edition

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4.0

I'm torn about giving this book 4 stars, it honestly was 5 stars, but to be fair is more like 4.5 stars just because it took me a little while to get into the writing at the beginning, which I ended up loving. This book was a wild ride, with incredible plot twists and lots of trigger warings for drugs, rape, blood, murder. A new favorite, truly unforgettable.
"You picked the wrong girl"

kelseywho's review against another edition

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5.0

What a book. I could not put this down once I picked it up. It's a glorious Macbeth retelling that just revels in the blood it spills. It does lose steam about 2/3 of the way through, but that doesn't stop it from going all out at the end.

jessrenbash's review against another edition

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4.0

I loved this book! The writing style is amazing, so descriptive and it pulls you in. A fun revenge story and an excellent retelling of Macbeth.

elizacatsingleton's review against another edition

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5.0

This book begins with a trigger warning; please heed it. But also keep reading, if you can. Because what follows is the most poetically woven story of trauma and desire for revenge. Hannah Capin does not flinch from the darkness, she embraces it through Macbeth and Jade and her coven. They set right the heartbreaking and infuriating wrong that was done to her. Foul Is Fair does require some suspension of disbelief, and it's not for the faint of heart. It hides in plain sight. It doesn't show its wings until you open it's pages. It's declaration that consent is a non-negotiable is both quiet and loud. You'd never know, looking at the cover, what lies within. It's necessary conversation. Eighteen year old me needed this book. Nineteen year old me needed this book. Other young women need this book. Because most will remain silent, and they all want to see justice done. Even if it's fiction.
Bookstagram Review: https://www.instagram.com/p/B9zhy-0hY6c/?igshid=yck2uq5fhpku

youngatheartreader's review against another edition

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4.0

I want to start out with trigger warnings.  The author has been kind enough to provide an entire page of trigger warnings, so I will simply direct you there if you are wanting to know (https://www.hannahcapin.com/foulisfair); however, the story does center around sexual assault and rape culture.

Hannah's writing hand me hooked from the moment I opened up this book! It was everything I was looking for in trying not to hit a slump. 

Foul Is Fair reads with such a dark and gritty feeling.  Jade, from the moment we meet her, has such a feeling of emotional disconnect - before we end knew what happened to her - but that somehow made me feel even more connected to her.  I found Jade to be a strong character.  I loved how she interacted with the other characters, the St. Andrew's crowd and her friends, who she constantly refers to as her coven (love!).  However, with Jade's emotional disconnect, I never really felt the love of her friends.  Everyone felt like they were kept at an arm's length, even when she was getting their help.

I don't know how she manages it, but Hannah manages to make everything so dark and gripping that I never wanted to put the book down.  I'm still reeling after finishing the book only a few short days ago and I'm not even fully sure of my feelings.  What I do know is that this tackles rape culture in a fantastical, yet somehow respectful way.  I have seen others compare it to Heathers, and yes I feel like it has similar tones to it (although it has been many years since I have watched Heathers).

Overall, I would gave this book 4 stars and I'm glad I got to read this when I did.  Thank you Hannah and St. Martin's Press for providing me with a copy.

https://youngatheartreader.blog/2020/02/15/blog-tour-foul-is-fair-by-hannah-capin-review-excerpt/

kaplanlk0086's review against another edition

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dark fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.5


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drunkonreading's review

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adventurous challenging dark fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? No
  • Loveable characters? No
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

2.5

I would’ve loved this if I read it in high school but it just missed the mark for me. Still a “fun” (I know that’s not the right word) read but I could’ve gone without it 

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gobblebook's review against another edition

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3.0

This is a retelling of Macbeth, set in a contemporary private high school. The narrator, Jade, is both Lady Macbeth and one of the witches. After she is drugged and raped at a party, she vows revenge on everyone who was involved, transfers to their high school, and systematically arranges their murders. This isn't for the faint-hearted. The rape itself is never explicitly described, but it is referred to constantly throughout the book. One of the witches is trans, and bullied for it. And there is a lot of blood. The narrator constantly describes a vicious and heartless need for revenge. I read Capin's "The Dead Queen's Club," and I was hoping this would be similar. In some ways, it is - obviously both books are set in high school, and they both focus on the incredible power of female friendships in the face of patriarchy, but this book is nowhere near as clever as "The Dead Queen's Club." "The Dead Queen's Club" is funny and full of very clever references to Tudor culture that really pay off if you're a history nerd, but this book pretty much has one trick, which gets flogged to death. The book is one giant revenge fantasy, and it's really hard to sustain that for an entire book - by the end, Jade's constant repetition of her need for revenge is really tedious. At first, it's interesting to see how Capin fits the events of Macbeth into her story - as a reader, I was waiting for the big scenes ("Is this a knife I see here before me?" "Out, out, damned spot!") and it was fun to see how they played out in the context of a high school.... but then I was really disappointed when there was no Birnam Wood. As a reader, I ran out of steam a little over halfway through the book and it was a slog to get to the end - it felt like Capin's creativity dwindled as the book went on.