Reviews

The Women Could Fly by Megan Giddings

rosemwood's review against another edition

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3.0

This was basicly a witch tale of feminism and freedom. An alternate America with injustice for women. It was very thought provoking and I felt many questions were left unanswered. The wondering flashbacks where a little annoying and distracting. I wish the story could have held more of my attention. Jo was really the only character that I really liked. I couldn't stand her father nor most of the males in this story.

vengefuldime's review against another edition

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4.0

It has an easy and inviting style, in a kind of smooth and meandering way. I kept having moments of recognition- I’ve felt this, I’ve thought of this, or I recognize this. It’s very blatant, and highlights the unfortunate similarities in current racial/gender/political topics. There is a deep love for stories and stories within stories. It’s not all a terrible, terrible time, but the the framework for the entire fictional society is alarming. Actions do not have to be logical, they have to conform and uphold the existing power structures (and foster self-policing). I was half-waiting for a reveal that magic was not real in this world either. In the end, the combination of real magic and nonsense fears may as well have been one concrete thing. The women’s lives were affected so deeply anyway. Although there are several intersectional issues at hand, I thought they were intertwined together well, given breathing space in such a vibes book.

The individual, relationship, and family-ruining effects of the society they are trapped in are very detailed and saddening. The protagonist’s mother was a terrible mother, but she was also never set up for success (and pushed towards an expected child). That doesn’t mean I wasn’t becoming incensed at times. The feeling of not being able, and never going to be able, to get all that someone need from a person is such a frustrating feeling. Her relationship with what could be an optimal partner, maybe, also couldn’t truly get off the ground with the unchangeable imbalance between them. The protagonist just does what she can in a world outside of her full control. I can’t say that the witch world seemed very personally appealing-but it seems to be what she would need and is so different from the alternative. A few things were negative for me- I am skeptical on the existing gay culture in the world mirroring the real one so well with the historical setup, and I have no idea how her mother accomplished the will and doll. Other than that, although it was a surprise literary book for my book club that I wouldn’t have picked for myself, it was stressful, sweeping, clear.

heiss13's review against another edition

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Couldn’t relate 

yellow_library's review against another edition

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dark emotional funny hopeful inspiring mysterious reflective sad tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

passthedetritus's review against another edition

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dark emotional mysterious reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.5

dahud's review against another edition

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challenging reflective sad medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? No
  • Loveable characters? No
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

2.0

The premise is interesting and had some great potential, especially the theme of relinquishing expectations how others will as we would wish. Not to mention the witchcraft trope, which should speak to my heart. Sadly the book is racist. Yes, racist - just read the scene where Jo and her best friend are making fun of white/midwestern girls. Racism is not always toward the darker skin colours. The book is also misandristic. The main character makes a list how all men (yes, she says all, even strangers, passers-by etc.) hurt her this or that way. There is just one decent male character in the whole book. And lastly, with the mention of trans community just thrown in there with no follow through and using „cis women” and „cis men”, I was wondering whether the author really was so concerned about certain issues or just trying to capitalise on the current social trends.

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martha_is_reading's review against another edition

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There was nothing wrong with this book at all, I still like the premise. I just noticed that I had several days where I could have reached for it and didn’t so it’s obviously not the right one for me 

kat7890erina's review against another edition

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4.0

The women of the modern world are afflicted by magic. Especially women of colour. They are witches. Men can't be witches (unless they are homosexual, or poor, or not-white). Women must be married by the age of 30.

Jo is a complex and relatable bi-racial woman trying to exist in this closed-minded world. Her insights into the people around her are engaging and the social commentary woven through the story is smart and direct. Giddings's magic realism grew on me like a delicious psychedelic fungus.

dreamweaver's review against another edition

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dark emotional mysterious reflective sad fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

4.0


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emiliemarigold's review against another edition

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Weird flow of plot, characters aren't likeable