reader53's review against another edition

Go to review page

emotional hopeful informative reflective medium-paced

5.0

I used this book for a research paper, but it interested me throughout the whole thing. There is excellent use of quotes and the occasional photos also help tell the authors narrative and Chin’s story. 

katiegrrrl's review against another edition

Go to review page

4.0

Another moment in history that started a movement, another movement that is not in our history books. I felt a bit of connection to this because I know the area of Ferndale that is written about.

2022 YMA YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults finalist

jwinchell's review against another edition

Go to review page

4.0

Everyone needs to know about Vincent Chin and his brutal murder in Detroit 1982 and the trials that came after. Everyone needs to learn about the beginning of the Asian American movement and how it connects to anti Asian sentiment in today’s world. Carefully reconstructed, Paula Yoo has created a compulsively readable and powerful work of nonfiction. Highly recommended.

jessamo19's review against another edition

Go to review page

informative reflective sad tense slow-paced

4.0


Expand filter menu Content Warnings

sducharme's review against another edition

Go to review page

4.0

The murder of Vincent Chin in Detroit, 1982 was a catalyst for the Asian American community as a step toward widespread recognition of the racism that exists in the US. The story of his killing and the ensuing trials (yes, plural) makes for a gripping read. Probably this will be of most interest to higher level students interested in social justice and/or the legal system in the US.

neglet's review against another edition

Go to review page

Really compelling account of the 1983 murder of a Chinese American man that clearly shows how the case galvanized the Asian American community to organize nationwide—and still does. Had trouble putting it down, it was that readable.

beatniksafari's review against another edition

Go to review page

3.0

This book about an important event from American history and its far-reaching impact is perhaps 30% longer than it needs to be. The long quotations, for one, could have been edited down significantly without losing any of the context and improving the narrative drive.

christinavarela's review against another edition

Go to review page

3.0

Audiobook. Every American needs to read or listen. Highly recommend the Asian Americans PBS series to go along with this book.

kenomilligan's review against another edition

Go to review page

challenging dark reflective sad tense

5.0

Phenomenal. This book is so extremely inspiring in so many aspects. Any word I write won't do this book justice of how eye-opening and touching it was.

I read this book for my school library program, eager to learn more about the history of Asian Americans. I could not be any more thankful that I purchased it.

Yoo's words pulled a variety of emotions from me as I read, and it is very obvious she put her heart and soul into each sentence.

This book was definitely a life-changer.

tracithomas's review against another edition

Go to review page

5.0

This book was really really really good. I didn't know this story and thought it was laid out beautifully for the reader. Yes, this is aimed at a YA audience, but honestly the book is for all ages (I would say over 12 because of language and violence). My only complaint is that the book has photos throughout and the photos have blurbs and the blurbs sometimes spoil what is to come in the book. Very annoying.