willa_reads_books's review against another edition

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challenging informative inspiring slow-paced

4.75

very informative but a little dense simply bc of content. everything is communicated clearly. i would definitely recommend this book

mitskacir's review

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4.0

This is an extremely important and powerful book. Alexander's argument for how slavery evolved into the Jim Crow era which in turn grew into our current era of mass incarceration is expansive and convincing. The majority of the book explains the horrors of mass incarceration and the policies that have made it so, but the final chapter is truly the most powerful as Alexander explains the danger of colorblindness and racial indifference. I learned a lot from this book, both about American history and about how to view it, and now I need to think about what to do next.

sabsabal's review

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challenging informative tense medium-paced

4.5

jadebananas's review against another edition

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challenging informative inspiring reflective medium-paced

5.0

joan_anne's review against another edition

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challenging informative reflective slow-paced

4.0

daumari's review

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5.0

There are plenty of other reviews that go into detail on why this is a worthwhile read. For me, this provided the legal cases, statistics, and laws that have turned mass incarceration into another form of a second class caste. Chapters are thoroughly cited with end notes in the back. Even though this was initially published 7 years ago, not much has changed and unfortunately remains relevant, especially in the age of a president who promises to bring "law and order" specifically to "troubled inner cities".

Not much else to say other than if you don't know much about the impact of the War on Drugs or what happens to citizens after they've been labeled as felons, this is a must read.

hillmeister's review

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5.0

Michelle Alexander explains how our criminal justice system keeps minorities "caught in a closed circuit of perpetual marginality" and disenfranchisement. Alexander provides a meticulous analysis and highly original framework for understanding the legal structures and policies that allow this system to not only continue, but thrive.

discokath's review against another edition

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challenging informative sad slow-paced

4.0

A dense but incredibly informative read. Hard to get though at points, but so is the system of social control it attempts to explain as simply as possible without omitting important court cases and complicated legal rules and proceedings.

kylenards1's review against another edition

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emotional informative medium-paced

4.25

kittykets's review against another edition

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informative medium-paced

5.0