Reviews

Permanent Record, by Edward Snowden

kbstein's review against another edition

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5.0

I knew the basics of Snowden’s story and what he exposed to the public, but this book goes a lot deeper than what you could have gotten from the news.

Snowden talks about all of the ways we are now losing our privacy and the consequences of it. He also shares about his time working for the government and the things he saw that ultimately led to his releasing of classified information.

This book made me a lot more paranoid about my online presence. I have already done things to lessen the access companies and people have to my data and will think twice before accepting all cookies on every website I go.

prabhat42's review against another edition

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3.0

Posting a review about this book online is ironic, given that a main theme in it is data privacy. I'm going to go out on a limb and do it anyway. The writing is powerful, but the narrative lacks warmth except maybe for the end. Snowden's intelligence comes across as raw and his life unstructured. The book, on the other hand, has a flow to it, despite seeming heavy around the middle. Snowden is like the Jason Bourne of the cyberworld. Given the extent to which he constructed ruses to hoodwink people, I did find myself doubting the tenacity of the reality presented. He raises important questions about the meaning of freedom and human life. He presents interesting answers. His descriptions of being a hacker and systems administrator came from a place of passion and were fascinating. Snowden paints very broad fears about people’s data and lives being insecure. These fears almost come across as chimerical before he abruptly states that they have already come true. Some more examples on the consequences of the lack of control people have on their data would have lent the fears and issue at large more credence. An explanation about why he ended up in Moscow rather than Ecuador, as originally planned, would have given his narrative more authenticity. His career trajectory seemed hazy at its end. Rounding off a 3.5 to a 3.

amandamonteiro's review against another edition

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informative reflective medium-paced

4.75

mantaq10's review against another edition

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5.0

Snowden's autobiography complements CitizenFour. It is the backstory that he hasn't talked about in public, his early years in life and in the intelligence community. How ordinary a person he is who took extraordinary decisions in life. The book is a reflection of his thought process and the ordeals he went through to become one of the most influential whistleblowers in modern times. A very engaging, enlighting and at times entertaining book (expect his quirkiness and nerd talk in writing)

wittenbergman's review against another edition

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informative inspiring medium-paced

4.0

diegombeltran's review against another edition

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5.0

Necesitamos más gente como este tío

deadpandasociety's review against another edition

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5.0

This book is so fascinating, I knew a lot about this ed snowden situation but hearing his perspective was well worth listening.

buckley's review against another edition

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informative tense
sorprendentemente bien escrito, una prosa amigable para un tema donde se tratan muchas especificidades. la tensión es palpable en los momentos más cruciales. por sobre todas las cosas una hermosa historia de amor.

___wat's review against another edition

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5.0

Enjoyed every inch of it, but I'm biased because Snowden is a personal hero of mine.
Opens with a laugh and keeps you hooked. Prepare to sweat when it gets to Lindsey's chapter.