Reviews

The Captive, by Grace Burrowes

sarahkgg's review against another edition

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2.0

Ugh. Ugh starting with the cover, and ugh continuing all the way through.

craftyhilary's review against another edition

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5.0

I reread this recently, and it hit me harder the second time. It's just so incredibly tender. Christian's genuine confusion and pain over what happened to him is beautifully contrasted with Gilly's own trauma. I liked this significantly more having read The Traitor, because it makes you see Christian's experiences in a new light. Grace Burrowes is a treasure.

slowtuesdays's review against another edition

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3.0

More like a 3.5, I think. This was a very nice - though a little quiet - book that was well thought out and well written. The scenes in which both Mercia and Gilly are recounting their thoughts and feelings of their (separate) captivities are heartbreaking but very well written (and I think you can tell that a lot of research went into how survivors tend to feel afterwards).

That being said, it really did tend to drag near the end and could've been a bit shorter. And the villain was perfectly obvious from the beginning.

loves2read's review against another edition

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3.0

Really a 3.5

aishadurand's review against another edition

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4.0

This was a SSSLLLOOOWWW-BURN romance, and it was beautiful.
Quick overview:

Christian- A Duke and soldier who has been held captive by the French for most of the war. At the end of the war, he comes back to find his home...not how he left it. He is hell-bent on vengeance and begins searching for his tormentors when he meets Gilly who reminds him that he has responsibilities.

Gilly- A new widow with a past full of secrets searches out Christian to ensure that her cousin's daughter will be reunited with her father. She agrees to stay a the house with Christian and his daughter to take over the duties of the home. The entire time she is there, however, she is plagued with "accidents".

Readers can easily fall in love with the characters because Burrowes takes the time to really build up who they are and what they believe. They also communicate very well with each other from the get-go. Mind you they disagree a lot, but those disagreements do not break down their ability to hold a proper conversation (which I have found to be rare in romance books).

Now I loved the romance, but the plot itself was just okay.

I figured out from the beginning where the plot would go (i.e. who the real enemy was) and mostly kept reading for the romance. This was mainly because the plot moved slower than the romance did. We get the love intrests together in a "mostly" sorted out and stable relationship and then we get the big reveal of who has been plotting their demise. However, it takes another almost two hundred pages for that individual to be dealt with. If the plot was a little stronger (and shorter), this could have been five stars

megfang315's review

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1.0

DNF. This one was confusing because I got bombarded with characters from the start. I kept having to go back and see who was who. Aside from that, I was kind of bored and just wasn't into it.

readermonica's review

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4.0

I started my love of romance novels by reading historical romances. Reading The Captive reminded me just why I love this sub-genre so much. Burrowes gives the reader everything that you could want in a historical romance. You get intrigue and danger right off the bat with Christian and his battle for survival and freedom. We get a heroine with a tender heart but is not without backbone and spirit of her own in Gilly. Gilly has her own set of wounds and dangers to face while trying to help Christian and his daughter Lucy to heal and find each other. Burrowes provides a richly told story that will keep you following Christian, Gillian, and even Lucy down their difficult and painful road to recovery. The Captive is a traditional historical romance done right. This was my first time reading a Grace Burrows book but it definitely not be my last!

**I received an ARC in exchange for an honest review.**

You can find more from me at Monlatable Book Reviews
http://www.monlatablereviews.com/

leisurelyreading's review

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3.0

It took me half the book to connect with these characters and feel their chemistry, but after that it was great. Triggers for war, torture, domestic violence, death of a child/spouse, amongst others. I’m sure someone else has a more comprehensive list, but those are the big guys.

muccamukk's review

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2.0

I started into this book really loving it. I'm a sucker for a well told h/c-heavy narrative that focuses on recovery, healing, and how to get on with life when everything you love's fallen to ruin and you're not yourself any more. The story started as a slightly torture happy (I'd been warned) version of that: two traumatised people learning to live again. Hardly new ground, but well told.

Then the telling derailed. The background plot meant to keep the action ticking along required Our Heroine to carry the idiot ball in such a staggering way that it destroyed her character (which reminded me of the other Burrows book I'd read, where someone spent 200 pages thinking an obvious lady was a serving girl), and Our Hero betrayed every bit of trust he'd spend wheedling out of the woman he's supposed to love (after having bullied her into a relationship in the first place). Plus the nice commentary on different ways society treats different kinds of violence turned into a Don't Miss The Message cluebat assault, and the pacing disintegrated around the book's ears.

Which is a pity, as I love me some h/c and the book had potential to say smart things about interesting topics, before it tripped on its feet and fell to its death.