Reviews

Where Am I Now?, by Mara Wilson

jlmb's review against another edition

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2.0

I feel bad only giving this memoir 2 stars but it is what it is. It's not a horrible memoir, Mara seems like a really nice person. It's just sort of...dull. She was so young when she made the movies that she is famous for, that she can't recall them in much depth. My main interest was reading about a child star transitioning to normal adult, true, but I thought there would be more child star parts in the book. This is mainly the memoir of a depressed & anxious teenager whose mom died. Maybe if I'd gone into the memoir expecting that, my enjoyment of it would have been greater? As it stands, it was just ok.

zagoraca's review against another edition

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4.0

It feels like I've just spent a few hours talking with an old friend. Is that super creepy or just a testament to Mara Wilson's writing?? Either way, Mara is a great storyteller and not to mention, extremely funny and smart. Thank you for sharing your life with us, in such a touching autobiography!

sleeping_while_awake's review against another edition

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3.0

Where Am I Now? is the memoir published by Mara Wilson, a very recognizable child star to anyone alive in the 1990s. She is most famously known for playing Matilda.

The title is a familiar question to most child stars. They seemed to have dropped off the face of the planet, and every so often appear in an online article with a bunch of other child stars, current photos displaying in a slideshow.

The memoir isn't solely about her movie-filled childhood. It's certainly a influential part in the narrative and on her life, but Wilson had more difficulties occurring in her personal life. Her mother suffered from cancer, and died shortly before Matilda was completed.

Her father, although loving and kind and trying to raise four other kids at the same time, made her feel sheltered and kept her from playing more mature parts as she aged. Wilson found mother figures where she could. However, no female figure ever became a permanent fixture in her life, and this seemed to contribute to an awkward adolescence.

Wilson, now formally diagnosed with OCD, and was clearly anxious as a young child. She formed a negative view of sexuality at a young age. Her relatively pessimistic way at looking at things probably kept her from going off the edge and having bad behavior as she got older, as she was afraid of what could happen.

Wilson gave up on movie acting because she kept getting type-casted in cute roles too young for her. Additionally, she didn't give a lot of effort in her auditions because of her frustration.

Much of the book details her early romances and issues with supposed friends. It can be painful reading, not because of Wilson's writing, but the topics themselves are embarrassing. They did get a bit repetitive, which is why I give 3 stars.

I found it interesting that Wilson's high school was the inspiration for Glee, as there were a bunch of choir clubs and competitions. Totally different from my high school.

A bad stand-up performance is the ending of the book, with the writing indicating that at least Wilson is doing what she likes surrounded by true friends.

I adored the movie Matilda, especially since I was a bookworm as a kid. Wilson does have a chapter as a "Dear Matilda" letter, acknowledging the good this character did for her in personal life, but also recognizing that she is a separate person. She does detail some of the events on the Matilda set, and makes Danny DeVito and Robin Williams as great as they have always seemed.

There is a re-print from her blog, I believe, expressing her feelings after Robin Williams's death as well, and it's a high point of the book.

The writing is a bit more advanced than the typical memoir, but still in an easy-to-read manner. There are a few pictures, although some of them seemed random in their placement later on.

zoey1999's review against another edition

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4.0

3.5 Stars

mirandahale's review against another edition

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5.0

entertaining and insightful-- i related to mara wilson in every way (except the child actress part) & her writing style is so engaging; i was never bored.

allicat89's review

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emotional funny inspiring

4.0

utmostcookie's review against another edition

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5.0

Hilarious, heart-breaking, insightful, a joy to read.

jeh270's review against another edition

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5.0

i loved reading this. recommended.

readutation's review against another edition

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5.0

This is actually a really great memoir. Mara Wilson is a terrific storyteller: she knows how to make a simple story actually impactful and deep, and she has a way of being honest and vulnerable while still being comfortable. She also has a great grasp on the tone and voice. The emotions you can feel in her essays are already filtered and mature instead of still fresh and raw. Basically, her essays are well-crafted, and the audiobook is well-narrated. I would give a better review once I’ve gathered my thoughts already.

serenarae's review against another edition

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4.0

I think I would have given this book 3.5 stars if I could. I enjoyed it enough, it just didn't grab me. I think I just couldn't really relate to her experiences. Plus, it made me feel really old.