Reviews

The Good Times Are Killing Me, by Lynda Barry

ruby_fiora's review against another edition

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emotional funny sad
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes

4.25

teanahk's review

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3.0

2.5 ish. I just didn’t care for this book at all. It’s probably a perfectly fine YA book.

(I received a free copy of this through a giveaway on goodreads)

dchristiok's review against another edition

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5.0

Very good. Touches on some stirring subjects. Great book about growing up and how children view adults and teenagers.

renatasnacks's review against another edition

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4.0

(I'm calling this a graphic novel but it's not comics, but there are a lot of paintings in it. IDK. The paintings are like their own story. I like them.) I liked this book. It has a really authentic child's voice, dealing with racism & gentrification & such in a genuinely childlike way. And it's funny. Yays.

bibliomaineiac's review against another edition

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4.0

A lovely story, told in the voice of a young girl in the 60's. She lives on a street that has evolved from being predominately white to being mixed. The book highlights the racial tensions, and how they affected the children caught up in them. The voice of Edna is genuine. It would be a good book to help teach young people what life was like in the 60's from another child's perspective.

boygirlparty's review against another edition

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4.0

Lynda Barry captures the circuitous weirdness of a tween's thought process pitch perfectly; it's actually pretty eerie. This book was easily read under two hours, so I suggest it for my fellow Fifty Fifty readers (http://www.fiftyfifty.me), but seriously I just really love Lynda Barry so I'd recommend it to anyone.

thyroyalreader's review against another edition

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emotional funny informative inspiring reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.0


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jainabee's review

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4.0

It is fascinating to go back and reread this earlier version of Lynda's autobiofictionography. The characters are so familiar to me, and i feel i know things about them that they hadn't yet revealed at this point. Things revealed in later publications. Lynda Barry's world is a real place for me, and i can never get enough of her guided tours.

kathrynje3sr's review against another edition

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3.0

I enjoyed the book, but the first Lynda Barry book I read was "Cruddy". That was a spectacular novel. I guess my expectations were a little too high for this one. I would recommend the book though.

jdianm's review against another edition

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4.0

I enjoyed the story and especially the style Lynda Barry tells it in. She uses the theme of music to write about growing up. She has a straightforward descriptions about the gap between the ideals of equality her english class reads about, and the fact that once she gets to 7th grade everyone separates into groups of people that look the same.
She also includes profiles and portraits she wrote and drew of musicians from the 19th century. The musicians' lives sound amazing and tragic and there is definitely common themes in blues, zodico, cajun, and country music.