Reviews

The Fact of a Body: A Murder and a Memoir, by Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich

amyherbert's review

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4.0

A hard book to read; filled with sadness and hurt but still a worthwhile read. The author blends her memories with the murder case that captured her attention as a law student. She digs through the past to find what led to certain moments and in the end shows us that people are complex and their stories are just as unfathomable. A recommended read.

thelifeofkim19's review

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3.0

I should start this review by saying that I don't normally read non-fiction... I find it quite difficult to keep up with a bombardment of facts without writing them down as I go along. This, obviously, isn't conducive to reading on the go or in bed, which is coincidentally how I do pretty much all of my reading.
However, I was SO pleasantly surprised by TFOAB. I read this as I had seen plenty of rave reviews about it and thought, as the national public librarian, I probably should at least try to give it a go, as it seemed like one of those 'You Must Read Before You Die' type of books. I was NOT disappointed.
This book is written in such a flowing narrative style, and is so utterly absorbing that I found myself looking for any available moment to fit in some more, even if it was just a few pages.
Alexandria's own story is cleverly and believably interwoven with her research and retelling of the murder of Jeremy Guillory. Both stories are heartbreaking and sorrowfully convoluted. More often than not, 'stories' are nicely wrapped up, as the reader is clearly directed towards someone to 'blame'. However, with TFOAB I was left feeling a little uneasy, as there is no clear perpetrator of the blame. The example of the law of proximate cause in the prologue is 100% fitting, and if you keep that in mind throughout the reading of this book, you might be able to rationalise this feeling of uneasiness.
I cannot recommend this book enough, whether you enjoy learning or reading about law, well-written memoirs, tales of human adversity and survival, or simply a good old mystery.

williamlundeen's review

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dark informative medium-paced
First half was pretty hard to get into, but after I “got it” I gobbled this up

okinmybook's review

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challenging dark emotional sad tense slow-paced

zekereadshorror's review

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dark reflective sad tense slow-paced

4.0

amykuc's review

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challenging dark mysterious reflective sad slow-paced

3.75

bizy's review

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dark emotional reflective medium-paced

3.75

loveless_reads's review against another edition

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challenging dark emotional sad tense slow-paced

3.5

It's hard to find the right words to describe this book. Is it depressing or hopeful? Disturbing or insightful? At points, it is all of these. The story is so raw & chalked full of emotions it makes it difficult at points to continue on. The author does a fantastic job weaving the narrative of two stories together but it is a tough pill to swallow. Details that are so disturbing I'm not sure I'll be able to think of certain things the same way ever again. Read with caution but boy are you in for one shocking ride if you do!

felixsanchez's review against another edition

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5.0

I don't really know where to start with this. It is so tenderly written, so much care is taken to gently guide the reader through the both stories that it is almost miraculous. It's so disturbing, and Marzano-Lesnevich is distinctly aware of this. She writes beautifully, distinctly, succinctly but evocatively.
If you have any interest in true crime, law, memoir or even journalism, please give this a shot.

delaneyreadssff's review

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3.0

3.5 stars.

This book was so hard to read and has about 7,368 trigger warnings.
If you are not in an excellent mental head space, please do not read this book.