valgus's review against another edition

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5.0

omg ya'll, this is a must read. i know i probably missed a lot that was going on, and will definitely re-read it in the future to better understand all of the finer details, but even so, the first read through was amazinggg. highly reccomended! more like this, please! <3

memoandradee's review against another edition

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4.0

3.75 me encanta ver como Rivers Solomon explora los problemas del racismo en sus libros, y que todos sean de fantasía. Libros duros pero importantes.

mad_taylh's review against another edition

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5.0

"She was standing on the edge of a new world and so ready to jump. How Lucifer felt upon leaving the Heavens. He didn't fall. He dove."

novelreader13's review against another edition

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3.0

An Unkindness of Ghosts weaves a complex narrative about a generational space ship, the society of which is structured much like the Antebellum South. It is raw and visceral in its depiction of slavery and the systemic oppression of people of colour and comes with a few trigger + content warnings. I will leave those at the end of my review.

I am in two minds about this book. I loved the worldbuilding! You get both a real sense of the power dynamics aboard the ship as well as a true feeling of the community among the people of the lower-deck slums. The compelling characters and their often complicated relationships with each other are where this book absolutely shines for me. Everything is a bit messy and seems all the more real for it. I also appreciate all the representation in terms of sexual orientations and gender identities and expressions.

What didn't work for me as much was the structure. The storytelling, especially in the later part of the book, sometimes felt kind of jumpy and abrupt, almost as if some chapters were missing. The there's the mystery surrounding the blackouts, which initially feels like the central part of the plot but then gets kind of dropped and isn't really picked up again until the end. Had it been used as a clearer thread that guides the narrative, I think it would've had me more invested in that part of the story.
This brings me to the other aspect that didn't quite work for me: the sci-fi element. I couldn't picture what integral parts of the ship looked like (e.g. the whole setup with Baby and the work fields) and the amount of technical/scientific language was a bit overwhelming for me sometimes, contributing to the problem of not being able to envision certain things or even understand part of the plot.

Overall, I thought An Unkindness of Ghosts had a lot of really interesting elements though, and it tells a powerful story. I put the fact that I didn't connect with it as much as I wanted to down to personal preference in terms of writing style. That being said, I still appreciated it and - being mindful of the trigger and content warnings below - would recommend checking it out. 3.5

bociansara's review against another edition

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challenging reflective tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

maiakobabe's review against another edition

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4.0

Hot damn! I have never read a book with so many nonbinary trans characters (both main and background) which was very exciting. It also has some stuff going on with language and story structure that felt very new and fresh. The lead POV character is Aster, a member of the "lower deck" classes on board the generational ship Matilda . This means that she and her dark-skinned, gender-ambiguous neighbors are forced to do the manual labor required to keep the ship running: maintenance of its systems, monitoring its internal sun, farming in its indoor fields. She is also a talented doctor and scientist who synthesizes her own medicines and does house visits to treat patients. She also reads like a character with Autism, though I can't remember now if that word was ever actually used in the book. Her main emotional relationships are with The Surgeon of the ship, a young trans doctor who tutored her; her aunt Melusine, who raised her after her mother's suicide; and a sister/friend/crush named Giselle whose repeated experiences of trauma have exacerbated what seems to be a bipolar disorder. This book contains many references to assault, rape, systemic violence, and oppression. It's not an easy read. But it's worth it.

aoppold's review against another edition

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2.0

This book could have been great!!! There were elements I liked - the medicine, the mystery, the angst and anger. But by the time the book got around to actually unraveling the mystery and starting a rebellion it felt super rushed and unsatisfying at the end. She just leaves everyone else on the ship in the midst of a mess she completely created and she’s gonna somehow survive on brand new earth by herself??!? Ughhh. Would have appreciated more explanation that made sense regarding what her mother actually figured out and/or more development and advancement/success of the rebellion.

12_honking_geese's review against another edition

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adventurous challenging dark emotional medium-paced
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

naitasia's review against another edition

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5.0

That was clever, deep, dark, and delightful. The audiobook performance really sells what the author has done here.

rubyhosh's review against another edition

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challenging dark emotional mysterious medium-paced

5.0