Reviews

A Long Fatal Love Chase, by Louisa May Alcott

kslhersam's review against another edition

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4.0

I was pleasantly surprised by this book from the author of Little Women. Quite a change! Starts off nice and interesting and then becomes a little dark like Wuthering Heights. But unlike Wuthering Heights you still sensed Alcott's religious nature in the main character as she resisted her evil Tempest.

I felt like the book was a little stilted, since someone decided to edit it long after Alcott died so she wasn't able to fix things herself. It didn't flow that smoothly but the story was still exciting.

pelachick's review

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3.0

A bit of a different side to Alcott. This book is more of the type of book that was widely available during her life. The story is predictable but does have some interesting characters.

grace_graph's review against another edition

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adventurous dark funny fast-paced

3.0

gamersatoru's review against another edition

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2.0

So she died... okay? It was kind of obvious though, according to the cover. This book captured my interest at first, but honestly it wasn't Alcott's best book.

mcorinne's review against another edition

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4.0

This is quite possibly one of the COOLEST finds I have found in a bookstore (shout out to Pioneer Book, you guys rock). Seriously, it's called "A Long Fatal Love Chase" and just look at that cover. And it's written by our very own Louisa May Alcott. I could not wait to read this book, and man what a ride.

Ok first the back story is important here. So Louisa wrote this book right after she'd had a crazy year abroad in Europe and she needed money for her fam bam. The publisher told her to write something that people couldn't put down, and this is what she wrote. Honestly, I think she did a pretty good job with her assignment. But the publisher guy found it "too long and too sensational." I mean??? Seems like a him problem and not a her problem because HELLO she completed the assignment! Men. *sighs with exasperation*

Anyway... so someone found the manuscript and published it in 1995. And now we have it! Yay! This book is so super cool because it shows a side of Lousia that we don't fully see in her other books. I mean, Little Women is objectively the better of the two books, but this book is a little more untamed and a little more explicit in its feminism. It for sure has some flaws, but it was so interesting to read. However, I will say that they maybe hyped it up a little too much when they published it. And like obviously I do not blame them for that. But sometimes it's a bit problematic. Like multiple reviewers called it "erotic." Nope definitely not erotic. I don't even remember a single kiss in this novel. And it's a little disturbing that "erotic" is a word someone would use to describe this book because it makes me feel like they're romanticizing abusive behavior, which is definitely not ok.

Because honestly that's what this book is about. It's about how Louisa lived in a society in which men held the power, and that kind of society kills women, even women who are pure and good and everything that society tells them to be. She exemplifies this through the abusive relationship between the main character, Rosamond, and a man named Philip Tempest (I know some people think his name is ridiculous, and I get it, but I actually thought it was cool haha).

Back on track. Rosamond expressed this main idea really well in the book when she says, "I am solitary, poor and a woman; he powerful, rich and a man whom all fear. The world which rejects me though I am innocent will welcome him, the guilty, and uphold him." (Pg 153) WOW. What a line, am I right?

I would say the best part of this book is the beginning-middle (Pg 70-170). This is where the pace of the novel really picks up and you don't want to put it down. It's also where you really see Rosamond's determination and strength. She refuses to submit to the abuse, and you as the reader root for her. In this section I also LOVED the female relationships. There was so much of women supporting women and it honestly made me tear up. So beautiful. Chef's kiss. I would give this section 5 stars honestly.

After that it gets a little repetitive, and you start to see the plot twists coming. Also this Ignatius character comes into the story. And I have nothing against him, but I honestly think he was completely unnecessary and the book would have been better without him BECAUSE Rosamond starts to stand up for herself less and relies on this dude to stand up for her, which just isn't as cool to read about. And he had too much of a Savior complex and the way he kept calling her "my child" was super weird, I don't care that he was a priest. It was weird.

The ending was written well, and although Louisa hints at it a lot so you know it's coming, it still surprised me a little that she actually went through with it. And I think it really drives in the points she is trying to make with this novel.

So. In conclusion this book is cool because you get to see a *little* bit of a wilder side to Louisa. If that interests you, GO FOR IT. It's a fun read.

unabridgedchick's review against another edition

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5.0

One-sentence summary: Naive Rosamond is seduced by the vile Philip Tempest and when she tries to leave him, he begins to obsessively stalk her.

Why did you get this book?: Alcott and potboiler fangirl.

Do you like the cover?: No, but there's nothing exciting about it. It looked a bit like a romance novel.

Did you enjoy the book?: Loved it, but I knew I would. The plot rests on a series of improbable coincidences so if you're a stickler for character development and tight plotting, don't bother. But if you like a good potboiler, dig in!

laurenla's review against another edition

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2.0

worth reading as a curiosity or academic experience, a gothic mashup with cliff-hangers and a whizz bang ending to suit a magazine audience.

kailey_luminouslibro's review against another edition

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3.0

Another excellent dark story. So dramatic!

annegirl's review against another edition

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4.0

Really more 3.5 but there were more 4 moments than 3, so I’m rounding up.

oregongirl85's review against another edition

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5.0

This book shocked me. I wouldn't think that stalking, priests battling with their vows and a living devil incarnate would be topics from 1866. However, I am so glad that I read this book. I love the storyline, the characters, and the scenes. I felt every emotion that the heroine felt, and probably some that she didn't. This is not something that I would have guessed the author of Little Women could have written, but she did it well.