ggallinot's review

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informative fast-paced

5.0

ikahime's review

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5.0

Want to understand how to manipulate language in order to benefit your own political adgenda? This is a must read for you, my friend!

bpol's review

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5.0

The examples may date this book, but it's a good dive into how those on the political left in the US have been terrible at articulating their values those on the right have been very effective at framing the public debate. A must read for those interested in how our politics are frames by our values and why facts often don't make a difference in our public discourse.

steph_84's review

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4.0

This book is for progressives who identify as progressives. If you don’t identify as progressive this book isn’t for you: as evidenced by many of the reviews by centrists and right-wingers who gave the book one or two stars!

It’s very important reading for anyone wanting to progress liberal issues, explaining how to frame issues and respond to the very-successful framing by conservatives so that their ideas seem like “common sense” to anyone not paying attention. I tweeted once that anyone who used the phrase “common sense” was probably a pushing a right-wing agenda. This book explains why that’s true... for now. It’s a good kick up the bum for progressives to be more strategic.

The downsides for me were:
1. There’s quite a lot of repetition. The editing could have been tighter. The ideas were interesting but in practice I got distracted by other books along the way rather than wanting to read it all in one go.
2. I know it’s by an American author but wow it’s really REALLY American. The assumption that Americans are superior to everyone else led to a fair bit of eye rolling and eyebrow-raising on my part, and I was alarmed at how even progressives were assumed to be pro-military. Most of the advice applies to other western countries, but not all.
3. The original book was written in 2004 but my version was updated in 2014 with a few notes throughout, which was an odd mix. For such a popular book I’d like to see a proper update with contemporary examples and ideas.

Irritating phrases aside, the Left really needs this book. We are losing the war and need to change strategies. I plan to implement these strategies and have already started talking to others about it.

k_b00kish's review

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4.0

Short yet powerful book about the power of language and framing from cognitive theory. I will need to listen to this again, as it contains loaded lessons!

ezribex's review

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3.0

Liked: this book uses science, it also gives practical advice

Wanted more of: cognitive science, economic theory

Think it would be good to put the practical advice in the final chapter into practice--sometime soon hopefully!

mommodan's review

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4.0



I finally understand the conservative mind.

everthorpe's review

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2.0

If you’re not well versed in politics, political psychology, or political ideologies, you will probably get quite a bit from this book. Some of it will be flawed and incorrect knowledge though, as there are many aspects of this work I thought flat out wrong, limited, or detrimentally simplified.
What is important to remember is that the writer is a cognitive scientist and not a political scientist, so he’s strong on the former, weaker on the latter.
Also i think the structure of the book is flawed. I would read parts 1 and 2, then the final chapter, and then the part about the issues. It would work better in that order.

tesshuelskamp's review

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4.0

Cognitive scientist George Lakoff explains the linguistic framing behind conservative talking points and arguments in a short and clear handbook. He argues that the most effective way to debate is to couch the issues you care about in your values (Equality, Freedom, Security, Responsibility).

I didn't do any digging, but the science seems sound. The framing gymnastics he encourages seems slightly Orwellian but not too manipulative. His dissection of conservative talking points alone is worth the read.

I'll probably read this book again right before Thanksgiving :)

jaytaves's review

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3.0

I liked the first chapter about the importance of framing and the way that frames, much more than facts, shape our opinions and beliefs. The rest of the book felt like really repetitive, unsourced, liberal propaganda. The strict father vs. nurturing parent frameworks seemed somewhat helpful in terms of frameworks but again they were introduced in the first chapter. At least it was a short read