Reviews for The Boston Girl, by Anita Diamant

megan_whatmeganreads's review against another edition

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3.0

I could have listened to the narrator of this audiobook (Linda Lavin) all day. She was fantastic! The book itself was enjoyable - formatted as a grandmother/granddaughter interview, with the grandmother relating the stories of her young adulthood in the 1920's and reflecting on what made her the woman she became. Very sweet and funny.

"How did I get to be the woman I am today? It started in that library."

"Hiking is the same thing as walking, only hotter and twice as far as you want to go. But usually you're glad you went."

celestemarin's review against another edition

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2.0

I think this is really a young adult novel. If it were, I would rate it higher. It was very slight--the typical story of immigrant girl who likes to read and faces challenges of family, poverty and social position, ultimately succeeds thanks to her intelligence and refusal to succumb to gender stereotypes. I've read many versions of this story (and seen it in movies and TV) but an adolescent or an adult not from the US might find it more compelling. It would maybe be a great book for an adult literacy program or adult English learners who do not know much about the social history of immigrants to the US, or women in the early 20th century. I would recommend it highly for such audiences.

bookofcinz's review against another edition

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2.0


Because I read and loved “The Red Tent” I decided to give this book a chance, even though the ratings were low. I am so disappointed. Think of a book where you are reading about your Grandmother’s life. It was a straightforward snooze fest.

The book itself is dull, lacks personality and beyond predictable. It follows the life of Addie, a very monotonous one if I may say so.
Please save yourself the trouble, unless you are looking for something to put you to sleep.

cleng's review against another edition

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4.0

Another wonderful book by Ms Diamant!

amydrichard's review against another edition

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5.0

Amazing

A really well written book that brought out so many emotions while reading it. The characters were realistic and I found myself becoming attached to them. Great read!!!

lelderkin's review against another edition

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3.0

A sweet, sometimes powerful book. But nowhere near The Red Tent in terms of quality. I love Anita Diamant’s writing style and it’s great here, but the subject just feels much more dreary than Red Tent. Anyway, relationships between women were again the focus of this book and I love that. Filomena and Celia were two interesting, sometimes tragic characters. Betty and Gussie are my role models. And Addie herself is so smart and honest and thoughtful. The premise of a grandma telling her granddaughter her life story was a bit clunky, but it was nice to have that forward-looking perspective. Overall a nice book but I don’t really think it was special.

kaybrown's review against another edition

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3.0

Well written story about early 1900s Boston.

palmerspageturners's review against another edition

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4.0

Read my review on my blog at http://palmerspageturners.blogspot.com/2014/12/review-boston-girl.html

I love historical fiction, and this book was no exception. This book reminded me of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn--although less wordy and about an immigrant, the coming of age story and the time frame are so similar. I loved Addie as a character--I admired her desire to learn and make something more of herself. The book was a bit slow moving at first and it took me a bit to get into it, but once I did it was hard to put down.

Naturally, I also loved Addie as a character because she too loved books and writing. In answering her granddaughter's question "How did you get to be the woman you are today?" Addie said "It all started in that library, in the reading club. That's where I started to be my own person." This book addressed so many issues--a woman's right to vote, the role of women in the workplace, WW1, The Great Depression, orphan trains, and child labor, just to name a few. This is why I love historical fiction--learning about these issues through the eyes of a character you connect with and relate to.

Diamant did a beautiful job with this book. I definitely recommend it for those who love historical fiction, particularly historical fiction set in the early 1900's. You will not be disappointed!

rachreads925's review against another edition

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4.0

I enjoyed reading this book and loved the characters, but looking back at it - the book could have said more. The author puts the main character and those around her in the middle of a lot of events and places the story during an interesting time in history - yet those events are only briefly touched upon. So many things like antisemitism could have been addressed, but were only glossed over. With this author, I expected more having been familiar with her previous works and the things she involved in. While I wasn't disappointed in the book per se, I just won't be singing it's praises all over town.

girlaboutlibrary's review against another edition

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3.0

Check out my YouTube channel for a 60 second book review of "The Boston Girl"

"The Boston Girl" by Anita Diamant is historical fiction and follows main character Addy as she describes her life to her granddaughter. The synopsis of this book sounds amazing and I was so excited to read it, I really wanted to like it - and I don't dislike it, I gave it three stars. Addy is telling her life story to her granddaughter, so a lot of the writing feels conversational, but it also started to feel like a list of all of the things that had happened to Addy. There wasn't that much exploration - not just in time, but also emotionally, it didn't feel like there was any exploration there. There wasn't much in terms of turn of phrase, and that was a disappointment. And it also didn't dive very deeply into any one historical event, the books starts in 1915- there's a lot to work with there!