Reviews

Colors of Fear, by Hannah Heath

storiesforhisglory's review against another edition

Go to review page

5.0

Intriguing

I read this out of order - I read book 2 first. This story sucked me in and held my attention. Wanderer is such a vivid character and he has such a unique story. The swirling colors, the conflict within him... I can’t wait to see what happens next.

ednapellen's review

Go to review page

adventurous hopeful fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix

5.0

I loved Colors of Fear. It was such a beautiful and believable story, from the characters, to the narrative, to the world, to the action scenes, to just about everything. 
Heath's narration and descriptions were grounding and intensive, but never over-done, rambly, or boring.

The world building was very real and, as I said for the story as a whole, believable. It never info-dumped and it also didn't leave me in the dark, even without the glossary (which I didn't know was there until later). 

I liked Wanderer right away, as well as his relationship with his brother. It only took the first ten pages for me to be sold on Wanderer as a character, and that was due to the way he interacted with and looked out for Twig. And from there, the more the story progressed, the more I empathized and I think understood Wanderer.

Length-wise, this short was perfect, considering this is one part of a bigger story. It definetly has me excited for the other short stories as well as the novel that it is leading to. 

If I had to sum up this story in just a couple of words, "engaging" and "believable" would probably be it, and those are both things that I love to see in fantasy. 
I very much so recommend this short story, and I'm excited to see where the others in this series take me.

rmarcher's review against another edition

Go to review page

5.0

This is a short story, so there's not a whole lot to it as far as words go, but it's a really rich story despite how brief it is. I was immediate invested in the main character and his family, and the portrayal of his emotions was incredibly well-written. The orange-haired elf also fascinated me, and I really wanted to see more of her.

The world was just as enthralling as the characters. Even though you see only a tiny piece of the world in this story, you can tell how deep and rich the world is, and how different it is from most fantasy worlds. Even tiny things like the scars bring so much depth and realism. The use of color, almost like synesthesia, was also really intriguing.

I was disappointed when this ended because I absolutely loved the world and characters, and I can't wait for The Stump of the Terabinth Tree to come out.

angelarwatts's review

Go to review page

4.0

Fast-paced, intriguing short story, leaving me super ready for the rest of the series. (PS. TWIG IS A PRECIOUS CHILD THAT I WILL FIGHT FOR)

ebdawson's review

Go to review page

5.0

Rich, intriguing, and so incredibly relatable. This glimpse into the life of desert-elf, Wanderer, will leave you wanting more! The world is fascinating and so real you can almost feel the sand beneath your feet. Your heart will break for Wanderer's family, the seemingly irreversible fate of his little brother, and Wanderer's own isolation and fear. It is a beautifully crafted short story that pulses with layers of meaning and future possibilities. I can't wait for the next one!

gracecrandall's review

Go to review page

4.0

This was such a lovely introduction to a fascinating world!

Wanderer, a desert elf from a region embroiled in war, does not want to follow in his father's footsteps. He doesn't want to join the ranks of the Warriors--a military branch with more deaths than victories. He also doesn't want to stay home and watch his brother die of the same sickness that has left Wanderer wracked with strange visions of colors overlapping his world.

He hopes to join the ranks of the Hunters--another branch of the military that will give him a chance to survive long enough to make a difference in the war. But the world is more complex than is easy to judge at first glance, and there's a chance that Wanderer is supposed to do something greater.

I really love Wanderer. Though it was initially difficult to picture, there was a visceral quality to the way he saw colors overlapping every part of the world--the way they could be sometimes helpful and sometimes distracting. His pain, rage and fear made perfect sense, and I loved how they could be so raw while he still remained likeable.
Also, I'm really intrigued by the world as a whole--there's so much more to explore.

This was a super fun read! Looking forward to picking up the next few books in the series :D
More...