Reviews

The Inexplicable Logic of My Life, by Benjamin Alire Sáenz

franz_willem94's review against another edition

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emotional hopeful reflective sad
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

3.25

sugarandstars's review against another edition

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emotional hopeful reflective slow-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

jpanslabyrinthofbooks's review against another edition

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5.0

"Maybe that's what life was. You zigged and you zagged and zigged and zagged some more."

Saenz perfectly describes the honest perceptions of life beautifully through this quote. Life doesn't have a linear path; there will always be twists and turns along the way. There will be obstacles. Some of those will be easy to hurdle over. Others will feel like you're crawling. And in this book, there is a tremendous focus on self-discovery in youth. Dictating your path. Choosing who YOU want to be.

I already feel very connected with this book, not only playing on the themes of identity and friendship but also family, morals and values. There is a profound focus on the morality of familyhood and whether family is solely biological or being nurtured. The characters growth, Salvador and Samantha mostly, is incredibly justifiable to the notions of youth and the turmoil and ecstatic tribulations of discovering yourself. Experiencing all-sorts of emotions and not being in control, at the age of seventeen, is something relatable to all individuals.

The major thing that made this book truly inspiring was the lack of romance; I didn't want there to be a huge focus on romance. The refreshing nature of solely focusing on friendship and family was exactly what I needed. I do love romance. But I don't think every novel needs romanticisation.

Saenz has crafted a book that encapsulates the idea of identity for its entirety; the moments, the struggles and the 'growing up' that every youth experiences.

mactavias's review against another edition

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Im not going to give this a rating. I cant decide between 3 and 4 stars, since it's a really complicated book for me, and I have a feeling that I'm going to change my mind later. Here's the gist: plot was amazing (even though it felt like recycled ari and dante sometimes). It was really, really interesting and I absolutely LOVED sam and fieto (idk how to spell his name, i used the audiobook). They were adorable. But Sal... he was a weak character. Not physically, of course, but he had no depth. He felt really flat. It felt like I was reading about Sam and Fieto and Sal's father's lives and Sal was just the narrator, not about HIS life. I gotta admit, the last three chapters made it much better, but that doesn't change the fact that I felt nothing for him. I wanted developed relationships! I wanted to feel something for him and meemaw and his father! But it didn't happen. Also, there is a spoiler that bothered me but I'm not going to say it because this is spoiler free. Overall, great plot characters, but the main character was missing something. However, still a good and enjoyable story.

lrcartee's review against another edition

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4.0

Sal’s life was as close to perfect as it could get. His adoptive father was the best dad anyone could ask for, his best friend Samantha (Sam) was always there for him and his senior year was dawning. Yet despite all the good in his life, Sal could feel an anger welling up inside and he didn’t know how to deal with it. Did it mean he was “bad” and perhaps more like his biological father than his adopted dad? Could it be all the change that was coming his way? His Mima’s cancer recurrence, everyone pressuring him about his college applications, there was so much change being thrown at him, all he wanted to do was hunker down and have things stay the same. Then there was the letter. The letter his dead mom wrote before she died when he was three. His dad decided the time was right for him to have it but Sal just couldn’t bring himself to open it. He could feel everything he had always known shifting and the questions of who he really was and who would he become just wouldn’t be silenced. Then when an unimaginable tragedy struck Sal’s and Sam’s entire world collapsed and their resolved was tested as never before.
This book was a beautiful tribute to love. The love of a father and son, of friends and of families and mothers. The idea that love could come in all forms in happiness, in anger, in fear was throughout the book. In a world of uncertainty and skepticism, this book was a ray of light. There were sad parts and at times a lot of despair but love always wins in this book. Families being friends and friends being family leaning on each other to get each through even the toughest times. I loved that Sam and Sal were depicted as such loving and close friends without even a hint of romance between them. I loved everything about this book.

astrid13reads's review against another edition

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5.0

This book was a wonderful read! It touches friendship, family and mourning of loved ones, in such a stunning way for a young adult book. Which makes it not only highly relatable, you could also learn some lessons from it.

I love the writing style that Benjamin uses. The Dutch book publisher promotes it as a hot long summer that never seems to end, and it so true! Although this book's topics were very gloomy for most of the plot, I just felt the love that these characters have for each other poor from the pages.

The friendship between these characters are so gripping that I actually wanted to take some time out of my schedule to catch up with my own friends. I think these characters deserve so much love and in case you haven't noticed, I started loving them too.

Family is also very important in this book, some characters have a bad one, and end up with their chosen family instead. I find it difficult to try and explain the feelings this book brought up with me, but there were a lot of them. Mourning loved ones unfortunately also was a part of this book. It was beautifully done and although some might argue after reading that there was too much drama, I found that it was exactly right, you just can't choose the inexplicable logic of life. I found that really losing a loved one is not much addressed in a slow way in most ya books, especially in fantasy what I read, so it was really nice to read a book that dealt with it the proper way.

In summary; go read this book because it wrecked me up, in a good way.

aimeeaimeeelise's review against another edition

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2.0

I wanted to love it because I loved Aristotle & Dante, but I had a harder time getting into this one. I felt like nothing was happening throughout the entire novel... It felt very level headed, no huge spikes of conflict or interest. It was, honestly, just a nice story. Teen had identity crisis. Teen realizes he has an amazing support system. Teen overcomes. Ba-da-bing.

I started reading this normally, then had to switch to the audio because I had no motivation to pick it up...

samsplaining's review against another edition

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5.0

One of the most beautiful books I have ever read.

alonsonm's review against another edition

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3.0

I think I was expecting too much from this book after reading Aristotle and Dante discover the secret of the universe from the same author.
The book is good. It made me reflect on my youth and my own life. But a lot of passages were irrelevant. I identified too much with the main character. I liked that because it confronted me with myself but at the same time I thought: this character isn’t interesting enough to have a book written about his life. His friends’ lives and even his dad’s life seemed more worthy of a book. Perhaps with 150 pages less, the book would have been great.
Regardless of my critic, I enjoyed reading this book.

clemebear's review against another edition

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5.0

“dad always said that there was nothing wrong with crying and that if people did more of it, well then, the world would be a better place.”
(the inexplicable logic of my life, page 13)

benjamin does this to me every! time! he knows how to make me fall in love with his beautiful words. the book started off very slow, i’ll admit. i didn’t know where the plot was going, but after a while that was ok. while i read this, i missed my mom so much even though she was in her room just across the house. i missed my dad so much and this book got me out of my head when i found out he was in the hospital. this book made me grieve for people who were still here with me.