Reviews

The Empress of Salt and Fortune, by Nghi Vo

deljh's review against another edition

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adventurous emotional inspiring fast-paced

4.0

candyfairey_reads's review

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mysterious fast-paced
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

2.0

milli54's review against another edition

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3.0

3.5 stars*

coflan's review

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adventurous medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot

3.5

morcabre's review

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emotional reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

3.75

tanisha_k's review

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medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? No
  • Loveable characters? No
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

3.5

saenz's review

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emotional hopeful reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

5.0

need to get to the end before everything ties together. The end really makes the book

autumnal_daydreams's review

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adventurous dark emotional hopeful mysterious sad fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

5.0

The empress is dead, a ghost in the wake of her rule, her successor readying for her first Dragon Court. Empress In-yo hailed from the north, her arrival heralding the Emperor’s desire to further his reach to the northern realms and finds herself in exile after producing an heir.

The story of the two empresses is told in vignettes by a woman named Rabbit to a non-binary cleric named Chih through personal objects and recorded by a magical bird.

The world building, the political systems, culture and history established in 100 ish words is astonishing. Political fantasy from the perspectives of those often erased. Vo and In-yo alike find ways to subvert patriarchal restraints, and repurpose them into powerful tools for revenge.

sgauci's review against another edition

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3.0

3.5

emmreadsbooks's review against another edition

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3.0

I don't think this book was for me, but it was good. It just takes so much focus to fully grasp what's happening on the page (something that I lack). Well written, rooted in folklore, and able to evoke such emotion in so few pages. I enjoyed watching the relationship bloom between Rabbit and In-yo as they're thrust into exile. Personally, the ending felt a bit rushed but I want to reread this beauty.