Reviews

The Last Unicorn, by Peter S. Beagle

emilyrm's review against another edition

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There were things I liked about it (Molly Grue's character, Lir's goofy attempts to win over Amalthea), and by the end, I was eager to see how the story would be resolved, but I'm a little disappointed that it didn't grab me more. Maybe it was a wrong book, wrong time sort of situation, or I would've preferred it read aloud?

It did make me want to rewatch the movie, which I loved as a kid.

beaglevortex's review against another edition

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emotional funny sad
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

3.0

simon_apollo's review against another edition

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4.5

A good book that I enjoyed reading very much. It was nice to revisit this story in a new medium and see how it changed from first draft to this to the movie screen. 

rascality's review against another edition

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adventurous emotional hopeful reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.75

grannyweatherwax88's review against another edition

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emotional funny hopeful reflective medium-paced

5.0

This book was excellent and deserves its place in the pantheon of classic fantasy. It was funnier than I expected it to be, but was also very thoughtful and bittersweet.   

clutterbox's review against another edition

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4.0

Beautiful book
Felt like reading poetry. The words flowed peacefully around and I read as slowly as possible to make it last. Five stars

Second Read
I listened to it on audiobook, that ruined it for me. Could be the edition of the audiobook that I got but having music added was painful as was the singing. Much better read. Dropped from five stars to four.

lokidelta's review against another edition

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adventurous emotional funny hopeful lighthearted mysterious sad

5.0

bruc79's review against another edition

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3.0

Porquê 3 * quando o livro é considerado um dos melhores livros de fantasia de sempre. O início e o fim são épicos mas a escrita é demasiado prosaica p me atrair e falta a aventura permanente q esteve subjacente na minha obra favorita de fantasia "stardust" de neil gaiman. Face a isto confesso q estava à espera de algo bastante diferente.

badmc's review against another edition

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5.0

This book is an ode to old stories, to fantasy tropes and staples (The Lord of the Rings and Robin Hood, for example), and to human nature. It is not perfect, but I like my stories to be like that - it makes them more real, in a way.

This is a story about a unicorn, she who may be the last one in the world! She sets to find out if that is really the case, and the quest begins... On the way, she meets her colorful companions, whom I adore to bits. It is a real feat to achieve this level of characterization in under 300 pages! I stand in awe.

What I really like here is the fact that the danger is real, the stakes are high, and you really don't know how it's going to end.

Beautiful book.

jahshwah's review against another edition

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3.0

At turns charming and clever little fairy tale with often lovely poetical and lyrical writing that is sometimes obtuse. I could see reading and re-reading this and picking up new insights and layers. There’s a strong theme throughout the story of how humans are prone to loss of wonder and awe that I appreciated.

“He had made up his mind...nevermore to trouble the Lady Amalthea with his attentions, but to live quietly in the thought of her, serving her ardently until his lonely death, but seeking neither her company, her admiration, nor her love. “I will be as anonymous as the air she breathes, “ he said, “as invisible as the force that holds her on the earth.” Thinking about it for a little, he added, “I may write a poem for her now and then, and slip it under her door, or just leave it somewhere for her to chance upon. But I won’t ever sign the poem.”

“And I say to myself, when there’s time for a word,
As I gracefully grow more debauched and depraved,
Ah, love may be strong, but a habit is stronger,
And I know when I loved by the way I behaved.”

“When I was alive, I believed-as you do- that time was at least as real and solid as myself, and probably more so. I said ‘one o’clock’ as though I could see it, and ‘Monday’ as though I could find it on the map; and I let myself be hurried along from minute to minute, day to day, year to year, as though I were actually moving from one place to another. Like everyone else, I lived in a house bricked up with seconds and minutes, weekends and New Year’s Day’s, and I never went outside until I died, because there was no other door. Now I know that I could have walked through the walls...You can strike your own time, and start the count anywhere. When you understand that - then any time at all will be the right time for you.”

“I think I understand,” he said, “but I’m sure I don’t. I’ll try.”

“You may plant your acres again, and raise up your fallen orchards and vineyards, but they will never flourish as they used to, never - until you learn to take joy in them, for no reason.”

“I’m not poor Haggard, to lose my heart’s desire in the having of it.”