Reviews

Children of Virtue and Vengeance, by Tomi Adeyemi

keepupavocados002's review

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adventurous challenging dark emotional hopeful inspiring lighthearted mysterious reflective sad tense fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

5.0

sonncerai's review against another edition

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4.0

I don’t know what’s with the bad reviews of this book, but I laughed, I anticipated, and I cried. Then, I cried some more.

Mazaeli...little nephew

stephy_dee's review

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adventurous emotional tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes

5.0

mushuawaken08's review

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3.0

Not as great as the first book. The middle was slow. I hope I'm not the only one who is confused by the ending?

blackmetalblackheart's review

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1.0

I had problems with the first book in this series, but Children of Virtue and Vengeance continue all those problems and amplify them. The fact that these books are written in different perspectives per chapter make little difference, since every character's voice sounds the same. Characters continue to make bad decision after bad decision. The romance portions feel forced. The magic is continually used as a deus ex machina to get past any problem that comes their way. Consequences for the characters are not as severe or long lasting as they should be, often even being reversed quickly. I was willing to give this series another shot, but I should not have. I need to get over my adversity to DNFing books.

junkxe's review

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adventurous challenging dark emotional inspiring sad tense slow-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

3.75

mehtahussain's review against another edition

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1.0

DNFed at 63% (page 256),

This was unfortunately really, really bad in my opinion. I didn’t enjoy [b:Children of Blood and Bone] very much, mostly due to the lackluster and convenient ending, but the former parts of the book at least kept me turning the page to see what would happen, and I hoped to find answers with this second installement. But no, this was even worse. While I DNFed this, I looked up spoilers for the remaining half I had left, and I actually went to the back and read the epilogue as well. Suffice it to say, I'm glad I didn't spend my time reading the 200-ish pages I had left because the ending that I read here was equally as underwhelming as the one from Children of Blood and Bone.

Aside from the ending, our main character, Zelie, was someone that I just could not stand. I understand the amount of trauma Zelie has gone through, but I cannot root for someone who treats other people the way that she does, because trauma is still not an excuse to treat people like shit, especially after they call you out on it. Zelie constantly treats Amari like absolute shit despite everything Amati has done for her, Zelie never stands up for her, and is just infuriating to read about. I was honestly hoping for someone from the opposing side to end up killing Zelie, and for Amari to take over in her place and get all the glory, because yes, that's how much I disliked Zelie, someone who I don't think is even supposed to be an unlikable character to begin with!

Also, most of the characters in this story were acting like fools. The teenagers acting the way that they do, I can still understand because they are, after all, teenagers. But even the adults? Why was everyone so out of character? There was drama, conflict, and angst just for the sake of having content to fill up the pages, and it was all completely nonsensical. Characters from the previous books who should be expected to be more wisdomous and rational acted the same way that naive teenagers would. The story just kept going on in circles; there was constant misunderstanding and miscommunication just to drive the lacklustre plot forward.

I’m sure this book has its audience who would love it, but it was really not for me. Every minute of reading it was excruciating, and I felt like throwing it into a pit of fire and watching it burn (a little harsh perhaps, but oh well).

jhuynh93's review

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adventurous dark hopeful inspiring reflective sad tense fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

kjunemac's review

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adventurous challenging tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? No
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.75

I really like the lore and world-building centered around magic in this book series. But I find a lot of the main characters frustrating. I came into this book expecting to get some closure from how things were left off in the first book, but rather than some things being tied up, I feel like the open-ended strings have only multiplied. While I can understand using cliffhangers to generate interest in consecutive books in the series, I would have liked a crumb of resolution in the ending.
Spoiler I am mainly referring to the "final" battle at the palace which cuts off during Zelie's encounter with Inan only to have them end up on a ship in the ocean. I would have at least liked to see a scrap of the "new Orisha" before this new development.  
 

adityasundar's review

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2.0

That feeling you get when you finish the sequel to what was a decent predecessor only to realize it did a greater disservice to the story and characters. The arcs and relationships that the first book built are painfully undone here with little to no remorse.

Where Zélie emerged as a magi who found in strangers her family, she now crumbles with misdirected hate. I understood the root of her rage that comes from grief and trauma, but to have her wallow in it until the end with no growth or closure is insulting to her personality.

Amari was my favorite character in the first, and so, of course, she had to be ripped apart like a rag doll in this one. She might very well be my least favorite moving forward. If Tzain was a sidekick in the first book, he's literally pointless in this one. He doesn't even feature in action sequences, nor do Zélie and Amari validate him with so much as a remembrance. Inan was and remains underwritten. He barely grows from the wavering biped he was in the first book and served no purpose.

We get some flashes of potentially great characters in Roën and Ojore but they either die or harbor ill intent. If the King had a thread of motivation to exterminate magi in book 1, his wife the Queen has none. Great.

The magic system is exploited better here, but the power escalations are so frequent it can be in a drinking game. Zélie and others discover new aspects of the magic and are experts almost immediately. Death seems to be the only universal consequence to any magic, and that's conveniently reversed by using a different magic. It's all so safe and cozy, what with a counter spell for every spell. It's good to sprinkle magical evolutions and power ups, but when every random character can gain and master something so quickly, it feels more plot convenient than realistic.

I'll pick the third one simply to get done with the trilogy, but the expectations are low.