cjordahl's review

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2.0

Is it unfair to judge a 40-year-old comic book by my 2017 tastes? Is it uncharitable to find the 1970s style art, dialog, and narration boxes to be hokey, melodramatic, and corny? Some moments were so Adam West Batman.

It strikes me as lazy writing when characters simply blurt out their motivations or plot points from past issues to bring readers up to speed. I don't know, maybe that was the going style. I suppose the creative team probably was pressured to cover a lot of ground in limited space. But still... ugh.

just_fighting_censorship's review

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4.0

These fun stories from the 1970's include appearances by Dr Phosphorus, Hugo Strange, The Penguin, Deadshot, The Joker, and ClayFace III. The lamest story was without a doubt the Penguin's but the rest were fun and full of over the top drama, love it! Bruce Wayne loves and loses, has an awkward wrestling match with Robin, and Alfred keeps butler-ing despite being a patient in the hospital.

I would not consider these must reads, but a great choice for Batman fans who want to see the best of what 1970's Batman had to offer. You are transported to a simpler time when it was acceptable to call women skirts and dumb broads and Bruce was living in a posh highrise instead of his mansion.

birdmanseven's review

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4.0

This run had a distinctive flavor to it. It's written in a serious way, but still takes the time to remind the reader that Batman is just a guy. It's nice to see some relationship stuff with Silver and Dick. Often Batman is written like a machine, but here we see him being very methodical and and very human. Overall a really good set.

We discussed this run in detail when interviewing Steve Englehart for the All the Books Show: https://soundcloud.com/allthebooks/interview-with-steve-englehart

plaidbrarian's review

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5.0

This collects the all-too-short Detective Comics run by Steve Englehart, Marshall Rogers, and Terry Austin, which for my money, is the best run of Batman stories ever. It's not particularly innovative or unusual, just very, very good. The stories follow a definite arc - experiences are had, characters grow and change - but it doesn't require an extensive knowledge of prior continuity to appreciate beyond the bare basics of who Batman is and what it is he does. And it feels like a complete tale, with a beginning, middle, and end, and in longform serialized comics, that's a rarity.

kitpower's review

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5.0

So much damn fun.

whitejamaica's review

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4.0

A very entertaining read. Aside from Hugo Strange, Rupert Thorne, and the interesting Clayface, Silver St. Cloud and her story is what made Strange Apparitions so good. She evokes an emotion in Bruce/Batman that I've seen no other character do in comics.

5/5 Stars

kips's review

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funny medium-paced

2.75

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