Reviews tagging Death

You Should See Me in a Crown, by Leah Johnson

22 reviews

trinity_j_g's review

Go to review page

hopeful lighthearted relaxing fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.5


Expand filter menu Content Warnings

maddy_s's review

Go to review page

emotional funny hopeful lighthearted medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

2.75


Expand filter menu Content Warnings

daegubarnes's review against another edition

Go to review page

emotional funny hopeful inspiring lighthearted fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

5.0


Expand filter menu Content Warnings

kienava's review

Go to review page

emotional funny hopeful inspiring lighthearted reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

4.5


Expand filter menu Content Warnings

nyoom's review

Go to review page

emotional funny inspiring reflective sad fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.75


Expand filter menu Content Warnings

gnaj's review

Go to review page

emotional hopeful inspiring fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

3.5

I recently watched the movie Prom on Disney+ and realized that I actually don’t like prom stories all that much? It just feels archaic and stereotyped and generally anti-climactic, but I must say, Leah Johnson managed to breath life into a trope I otherwise find unbearably boring. 
 
First, the intersectionality of Liz as a character. A young black girl that’s still closeted in her relatively traditional town, what is she to do when a spunky and undeniably charming new girl comes to town? Especially when this new girl could pose a threat to her chance at winning the title Prom Queen and the substantial scholarship that comes with it? Then we remember her brother who lives with genetic sickle cell and the emotional toll that takes on their family, especially when they’ve already lost their mother to the disease. It’s layer upon layer, and done in such a seamless way. 
 
I absolutely loved watching the entirely platonic friendship that was Liz and Jordan. Honestly, the friendships in this book feel so underrated?
SpoilerGabi’s relationship with Liz should have been capitalized on more in my opinion. It was messier and more complex which could have led to a stronger and even more beautiful relationship after they made up, but it kind of felt brushed off. Like it was a check mark and suddenly, just like Gabi had feared, Liz didn’t need her anymore for plot and suddenly that was over. That was really disappointing to me.
 
 
The romance felt a little too much like insta love to me. I could feel that author trying to pace the relationship, but there was just no real space to do that in such a short book. Liz goes from feeling simple attraction to sounding like she’s about to pledge her soul and her future progeny’s soul this girl within a span of 200 pages. This is just my own personal taste though. I’m very much a fan of the slow burn and the platonic relationship. 
 
I really loved the exploration of allyship and what it means to be a true friend. How good people can still do bad things and that even though they are good, they still need to be held accountable. It’s honestly such a nuanced and underrated perspective that I wish I saw more of everywhere, so I’m really happy it was included in this book. Alas, probably not capitalized on as much as I would have preferred, but oh well. 
 
Liz’s character also struggles a lot with anxiety and I thought the representation of this was just so well done. I loved seeing Liz not be limited by her trauma and the symptom (anxiety) it bore, but how she adjusted and learned to live beside in it a ways. It didn’t go away, but it didn’t overshadow her and it didn’t limit her. So not only is she a black queer woman, but she’s also got that wonderful mental health rep. Oh, and she’s a great person, there aren’t too many of those around anymore are there. 
 
A little pet peeve I did have was when tension was created between Liz and her love interest because of lack of communication. I think if Johnson had explored more deeply the reasons WHY Liz was too embarrassed to properly communicate, then it could have been more understandable and also held a nuanced introspection on something that, again, is not spoken about widely enough. Unfortunately, that fell a little short for me. 
 
Near the end the pacing started to feel a little slow as we all knew what was going to happen and it felt like there was a lot of mental babble just to buy time. I understand that Liz was nervous, but it was a little too much and I wish it had been summed up by the author in a more concise way. We all knew how it was going to end and the rambling just felt torturous at that point. 
 
I also wish that some of the side characters had gotten more development. Don’t get me wrong, I loved the evolution of Liz, but it felt a little wrong that I could not tell apart two of her best friends to save my life. Actually, I think it was three. They just felt so inessential to the overarching plot, it was a bit of a pity. The antagonist’s character could have also used some depth, although if it was Johnson’s point to make her a racist homophobe, then I guess she really didn’t deserve any depth, huh? 
 
All in all, I must commend Johnson’s ability to revive what was, for me, a tired trope. I quite enjoyed this read!

Expand filter menu Content Warnings

leahlovesloslibros's review

Go to review page

emotional hopeful inspiring lighthearted medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

4.0

Liz Lighty never thought she'd run for prom queen. She's not exactly what most people would consider popular, and she definitely doesn't fit the stereotype for the gorgeous rich white girl who normally dons the crown at her upper-class Midwestern high school. Rather, she is a nerdy, average-looking black girl who is being raised by her middle-class grandparents, and who depends on a large scholarship if she's going to attend the prestigious music school of her dreams on the way to becoming a pathologist.

When her scholarship falls through, and the only way left for her to pay for college is to win the scholarship that comes along with being crowned prom queen, Liz is forced to put herself in the running. The new girl at school, Mack, is also in the running....and Liz is falling for her. Can she land both her dream school and her dream girl, or will she be forced to choose?

I found Liz to have many relatable qualities, at least for me personally. I was raised in a middle-class family where both of my parents worked and we depended on financial aid to help us through college, while many of my peers came from upper-class families that included a lot more privilege than I would ever know. Additionally, I was a total music nerd in high school, and never would've considered myself someone who would run for prom queen, much less actually win the title. Finally, I can remember so many of the feelings that came along with my first "real" (self-aware) girl crush and the relationship that followed; the dynamic between Liz and Mack bright up some nostalgic moments for me. Overall, I enjoyed not only the story, but the fact that the minorities fought for what they believed in, even when the school tried to shut them down.

Expand filter menu Content Warnings

irlchaosdemon's review against another edition

Go to review page

emotional funny hopeful lighthearted medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0


Expand filter menu Content Warnings

katiereadsthings's review

Go to review page

funny hopeful inspiring lighthearted medium-paced
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.5


Expand filter menu Content Warnings

dulcinea's review

Go to review page

emotional funny hopeful lighthearted medium-paced
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.0

 Young Adult Contemporary LGBTQ+ : ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

This was so lovely and feel-good! And a queer positive story about a loving multi-generational family thriving and understanding. I appreciated that Liz was a strong and positive female lead that struggled with just being "seen" and understood. Liz never got ugly even when that could have been an easy emotion to portray all she wanted was to do what was right and be a good person (maybe to a bit of a fault). 

Expand filter menu Content Warnings