Reviews for You Should See Me in a Crown, by Leah Johnson

library_char's review against another edition

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5.0

What a sweet, refreshing story with so much love and healthy examples of so many different types, and even more surprisingly without being super cheese. Rooted for Liz the whole time. A fantastic protagonist you just want to succeed.

heco1206's review

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emotional hopeful inspiring medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

4.0

gabbywoah's review

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hopeful inspiring medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

5.0

thenarratress's review against another edition

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4.0

Really liked this story.
Will post a review soon~

lauraestelle's review

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adventurous emotional hopeful inspiring medium-paced

3.5

thebookishdweeb's review against another edition

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5.0

"There are no real allies in war, only people who are valuable enough at the moment to delay the inevitable destruction they will eventually face at your own hands"

High school is certainly meant to be a turning point in our life. Friendships are forged, promises made, career prospects looked upon; it is truly a glamorous time. While, it can be devastating for some people because... Teenagers.

'You Should See Me in a Crown' can be considered as a light read, while at the same time it talks about important issues. I'd put this book between 'Mean Girls' and '13 Reasons Why' (though it's nearer to Mean Girls). Students struggling to get through scholarships, racism, ableism, homophobia; these prospects get a place in this book and it was beautifully portrayed.

With references to pop culture and characters acting like typical high school teenagers, the book also presented phrases like 'a public memeification' which cracked me up. The author has taken a lot of care to maintain the balance between humor and sarcasm, and it was too relatable for its own good.

Things I liked:
-character arcs portrayed A-mazingly
-relatable concepts
-usage of simple language
-WLW rep
-sheer satire and light-heartedness

Things I disliked :
-basically.... Nothing!

Target audience - people looking for a light read, LGBTQIA and black reps, teenagers

P. S: this book should definitely be made into a movie!

greenlivingaudioworm's review against another edition

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5.0

"This whole race is set up to mimic some twisted fairy tale. The queen is supposed to be the best among us: the smartest, the most beautiful, the worthiest. But the people who win are rarely the people who deserve it. Like with any monarchy, they're just the closest to the top. You don't earn queen; you inherit it."

Liz Lighty is the protagonist we all needed (but didn't know we needed). She is bold, confident, sure of who she is, and has a strong work ethic. She's the character I needed to read about in high school. Liz is working to attend her dream college but when a music scholarship falls through, she is forced to do the one thing she thought she'd never do in her cliquey high school: run for prom queen where a large scholarship is up for grabs. Liz doesn't want to burden her hardworking grandparents so she takes on this challenge with just the help of her friends. The next few weeks get interesting as Liz participates in all of the prom shenanigans while also grappling with rekindling a relationship with a middle school friend and developing a crush on the new student, Mack.

I loved Liz so much as a character. She is incredibly well written and relatable. I mean, what teenager doesn't go through growing pains in old friendships and develops crushes on new classmates? I really appreciated that Liz's story is one that isn't often told: she's a Black queer kid in a small midwestern town - a place that typically isn't overly accepting of Black (or) queer kids. This story is so important because all kids need to know they aren't alone and the world isn't as small as it feels in a small town. I loved Liz's relationship with her brother and her long-time friend, Jordan. I appreciated that even though high school was coming to an end, Liz doesn't let that stop her from making new friends and beginning new relationships. I think Liz's financial situation when it comes to college is a story that is all too familiar for many young people today. I know this story would have been refreshing for me to read in high school, simply to know I wasn't alone when it came to paying those steep tuition prices.

All in all, this book was like a warm hug. Leah Johnson is a force to be reckoned with and I'm so excited to read more writing from her in the future. If you like YA contemporary romance, then you will absolutely love this book.

TW: homophobia, parental death (off-page), public outing, anxiety attack, chronic illness

cgn's review against another edition

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4.0

Super cute book with great representation! I got slightly frustrated with the conflict, but I still flew through this book.

sonja123's review

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emotional funny inspiring fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes

5.0

Absolutely incredible. Loved every second of it. 

readingintheflx's review against another edition

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5.0

This book deserves any and every award that it can win. I absolutely cried at the ending - just a gorgeous, beautiful, perfect story.