snowrein's review

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5.0

Read “Mr. Death” by Alix E. Harrow, the second short story I’ve read from her, and my heart is not only soft but shattered in beautiful way. I found myself so, so close to tears reading this. She is an absolutely wonderful storyteller—a writer who weaves such beautiful prose with HEART. Mr. Death and Coraline Connelly shall haunt me for the days and years to come.

woahno's review

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5.0

This story had me choked up for most of it. I am certainly a sap for this kind of story and it hit me hard. This one is a high recommend from me.

xan_van_rooyen's review

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5.0

Well damn, what a powerful story. This got me right in the feels. An absolutely perfect short story. Loved everything about it!

tomatocultivator's review

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5.0

An excellent issue. Of particular note is "Root Rot" by Fargo Tbakhi, imagining a SF just step in the colonization of Palestine. A great return of a great magazine.

goranlowie's review

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4.0

Highlights:

- Mr. Death by Alix E. Harrow
- Root Rot by Fargo Tbakhi

foomple's review

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4.0

I read four of the stories from this issue:

Root Rot by Fargo Tbakhi was an incredible story, heartrending and brutal. Themes include the impacts of occupation on the occupied and the way national/cultural losses and personal losses are nigh-impossible to separate. I look forward to reading more by this Palestinian writer. CW:
Spoileralcoholism/addiction, suicidal ideation


I utterly, wholly loved Alix Harrow's Mr. Death.

I really liked Cassandra Khaw's Love, That Hungry Thing, even though I'm certain I didn't understand a substantial portion of it.

Gray Skies, Red Wings, Blue Lips, Black Heart by Merc Fenn Wolfmoor was intriguing, but I didn't get sucked into it as thoroughly, and I can't put my finger on why.
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