Reviews

The Horse and His Boy by C.S. Lewis

beklovesbooks's review against another edition

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  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes

5.0

Lovable characters, classic well-written, well-tied-together quest. Characters from The Lion The Witch and the Wardrobe make an appearance. Author has a marvelous voice.

ebelarge's review against another edition

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adventurous reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? No
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

4.0

maddysutton's review against another edition

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adventurous lighthearted reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

3.75

maebemerissa's review against another edition

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adventurous hopeful fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

3.0

You ever reread a book from you childhood and go "well that's a lot darker than I remembered." That was me reading The Horse and His Boy. This kid (Shasta) starts out as a slave pretty much, but has a pretty good hunch he's not from the area because he's ya know...white and everyone else is definitely not white (I get the vibe the they're supposed to be Southeast Asian). By the end of the book, Shasta has been chased down by a lion like 5 times, crossed a desert WITH NO SHOES, and gets thrown into a battle by a kid who looks a lot like him. Honestly, all things considered, Shasta takes them like a champ. There's definitely an ongoing theme of EARNING your thrown as a king and not just being born into it. I  have some follow-up questions about Narnia now: why is magic only a thing in Narnia and not really in the other countries? It isn't some sort of geographic limit, because Aslan seems pretty active in every country of the book. Why aren't there magical creatures in the other countries? Bre, who is a talking horse, keeps the fact that he can talk on the DL because he doesn't want to be used by humans. However, if there is a magical country nearby, what's to keep other magical creatures from going to other countries? Or people just kidnapping them? To be fair, I did not finish the whole series when I was younger, so maybe I'll get some answers in later books. 

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cburgbennett's review against another edition

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4.0

It's been a while since I've read the first two in the series. I like that the stories are short and descriptive. It was fun to have old characters return. Good story.

areadingbunny's review against another edition

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5.0

Want to know more about the lands far beyond Narnia? This is the perfect book for it!

So now we get to know more about lands that border Narnia. Far to the south, you can find Calormene Empire. And there's where the story of a young boy named Shasta begins. He meets this Talking horse from Narnia and decides to escape with it and leave his whole life behind.

His journey becomes more interesting when he meets his new companions, who are also traveling to Narnia. So now we have more characters, and the story gets even funnier.

Shasta and his friends have to overcome some difficult situations. The journey to Narnia isn't easy, especially for children. It's interesting how they handle these situations.

This was a fun read. I love that I get to know more about other lands in this world. The history, people, and their customs are a great addition to the whole Narnia world.

I'm giving this full 5-star rating!

weebee27's review against another edition

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adventurous dark emotional funny hopeful informative inspiring reflective tense fast-paced

4.0

sarahanne8382's review against another edition

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3.0

I really enjoyed all the books in this classic children's series, whatever the "correct" order to read them in. Personally, I think reading them in the order they were published makes more sense than following the internal chronology of the series, so I'm going to review them in that order. The forays into the magical land of Narnia are great fantasy/adventure books for children of any age, yet are interesting enough to keep even adults entertained. They're a little old-fashioned and stuffy, but serve as a reminder that that's no reason that a book has to be boring.

They can also be viewed as Christian allergory, but that theme's prominence varies from book to book, and honestly, if you aren't that familiar with your Bible stories, you may not even notice the similarities, yet if you're looking for connections, you'll be surprised how many you can find.

The Horse and His Boy: A side story that takes place primarily in Calormen and Archenland, the countries south of Narnia, during the Golden Age of the High King Peter. Bree, a Narnian talking horse, convinces the young boy Shasta to run away to Narnia with him, and they discover several surprising things along the way. Because it is directly connected to any of the other stories, it can probably be read almost anywhere in the series, but it is mentioned in passing in SC & LB. This book probably has the weakest connections to Christianity, although Aslan still makes an appearance.

grace_r_21's review against another edition

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adventurous hopeful inspiring fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

3.0

tracymorgan136's review against another edition

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lighthearted slow-paced

2.0