val_halla's review against another edition

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4.0

Somaly Mam is an incredible activist who continues to endure threats to her family and herself in order to operate a sort of Underground Railroad for modern-day slaves. She is not a writer, so most of the potential for this book is lost in matter-of-fact statements when descriptive narration could have served better. It's an amazing story, but the entire book is not a must-read because certain excerpts can get the same point across. Still, I'd encourage everyone to read a few articles about Mam and consider donating to her foundation.

applebunnies's review against another edition

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4.0

A very interesting, compelling story, although toward the end it started to sound more like an advertisement than a book.

jessaca_with_an_a's review against another edition

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4.0

Sad but heartwarming story. Easy read, physically anyways. Now emotionally on the other hand? Not a book for the faint of heart.

lindsayw's review against another edition

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4.0

This book was excellent. At first I didn't think it was going to be all that different from other books I've read about human trafficking and sexual violence. But when Somaly Mam talks about working together to build the children's centre, I literally got goosebumps. It was so inspiring, and the hope she has managed to create out of such a horrible situation is truly incredible. So glad I picked up this book.

omareduardo's review against another edition

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5.0

This was a difficult book to read, but it helped me gain more perspective around the issues faced around sex trafficking in other countries. It was sickening at times, very eye opening, and in general an intense story to read. I would greatly recommend it.

ainac's review against another edition

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4.0

This book would have been a 5 stars for me because of what I learned from it. I knew there is a huge problem with prostitution in South Asia but reading about the horrors that those little girls suffer was poignant and really made more conscious about the issue. I can't say it was an enjoyable read, obviously, but what I did really enjoy was learning about Cambodia, both their history and their culture, which I knew little about.

Then I've learned that the book is not an autobiography but fiction and that Somaly Mam has been involved in some fraud scandals. To be honest, I don't even want to know the details of all that mess, I'll just take what I've learned from the book and move on :)

sunnivamidt's review against another edition

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5.0

"There is one law for women: silence before rape and silence after." This book brought me to tears again and again. You start reading and you think it can only get better, but somehow it seems people can always find a darker kind of cruelty.

This book is about the prostitution and human trafficking of girls in Cambodia, written by Somaly Mam who was herself sold as a little girl to a brothel, and managed to get out and is now running an organisation to help girls who are in her situation. The story is horrible, and for a Norwegian girl like me it is unbelievable to think that these words are true. It is incredibly honest. It is such an important book.

midgardener's review against another edition

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5.0

A truly powerful and moving memoir. This window into the Cambodian sex trade is both harrowing and inspiring; I found myself being simultaneously horrified at the predicament of the girls in the brothels, and motivated to learn more and help in Somaly's cause. If you're interested in the plight of women in the modern world or in human rights in general, I highly recommend this book.

iiinge's review against another edition

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oke blijkbaar is niet alles in dit boek waar en is de schrijfster nogal problematic maar de gruwelijkheid van child sex trafficking blijft relevant en i dont regret reading this

lil_missbookworm's review against another edition

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4.0

It was good, but after a certain point it seemed to get repetitive.