djwudi's reviews
1045 reviews

Your Guide to Not Getting Murdered in a Quaint English Village by Maureen Johnson

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3.0

A very amusing travel guide for those exploring the English countryside. Of particular interest if you’re a fan of cozy mysteries, either the literary type with punny titles, or the BBC Midsommer Murders type.
Mirror Dance by Lois McMaster Bujold

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5.0

Complex in both story and character, this becomes an excellent exploration of the differing personalities of the Vorkosigan brothers, in the midst of military adventure and political maneuvering. As with the rest of the series, it’s Bujold’s ability to craft realistically flawed characters, some in very serious ways, while still making them relatable, believable, and often quite funny, that really makes these stand out. Though most of the books in the series are written to be readable on their own, this is one where I’d definitely recommend reading earlier books first.
Uncanny Magazine Issue 58: May/June 2024 by Michael Damian Thomas, Lynne M. Thomas, Michi Trota

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3.0

Favorites this month were “Happily Ever After Comes Round” by Sarah Rees Brennan, “Loneliness Universe” by Eugenia Triantafyllou, “Markets of the Otherworld” by Rati Mehrotra, and “Hands Like Gold and Starlight” by K.S. Walker.
Star Trek IV, the Voyage Home by Peter Lerangis

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2.0

A kid’s adaptation of the fourth movie, illustrated with stills from the film. Serviceable, exactly as expected, no surprises.
Clarkesworld Magazine, Issue 212 by Neil Clarke

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3.0

My favorites this month were “The Portmeirion Road” by Fiona Moore and “The Weight of Your Own Ashes” by Carlie St. George.
Brothers in Arms by Lois McMaster Bujold

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4.0

On a stopover at Earth, Miles’ double life as Lord Vorkosigan and Admiral Naismith finally comes to a head. More of the clever mix of military SF, politics, and quirky characters that continue to make this series such fun.
Star Trek III Short Stories by William Rotsler

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2.0

A collection of six middling short stories. Four are set between the end of TWoK and the main action of TSfS, the final two are set at indeterminate times (Admiral Kirk is in command, Spock is alive). As with the other Rotsler Trek books I’ve found, not really worth searching out unless you’re a collector.
Borders of Infinity by Lois McMaster Bujold

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3.0

Collects three in-universe novellas with a bit of a framing story. Of the three, the third was the best, then the first, and the last was the weakest. Admittedly, that analysis is definitely affected by modern biases; the middle story's approach to going beyond the gender binary, while likely progressive at the time, is very dated by today’s standards, and there’s a consensual intimate relationship that involves a somewhat eyebrow-raising age issue. That said, all three are still enjoyable additions to the Vorkosigan saga.

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Star Trek III: The Search for Spock Storybook by Lawrence Weinberg

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2.0

An uninspired children's adaptation of The Search for Spock, complete with odd errors ("Uhuru", for instance), illustrated with stills from the film.
Ethan of Athos by Lois McMaster Bujold

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4.0

A bit of a deviation from the main thread of the Vorkosigan , but still related (similar to how Rogue One is “A Star Wars Story”). Bujold continues to demonstrate a gift for creating flawed but endearing characters and dropping them into situations both amusing and adventurous. And while I wouldn’t have expected much from a sheltered, naïve, gay obstetrician who’s never met a woman in his life before venturing off-planet, title character Ethan makes for a very entertaining protagonist.