lialeahlio's reviews
218 reviews

A Bit Much, by Sarah Jackson

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emotional sad tense fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? N/A
  • Diverse cast of characters? N/A
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.5

4.5/5 ⭐️


I haven’t exactly handled her illness well.



A Bit Much is a stunning articulate story about adulthood, grief, and friendship; A well crafted debut by up and coming Canadian author Sarah Jackson.

The first time I heard about this book was when I was browsing the shelves of a local bookstore in Toronto. Immediately the cover caught my eye because of the colours and the sad faces on each finger. But I didn’t pick it up until it was available in my local library. One friend keeps raving about this book. I saw probably over 10 quotes from this book, so I was determined to read it once I got it from the library. As expected I understood why my friend keeps raving about A Bit Much after I read close to fifty pages of it.

A Bit Much is the debut book of Canadian author Sarah Jackson. The story follows the perspective of Alice, an unemployed twenty four year old woman, who is navigating through adulthood on the verge of falling apart as she struggles to find a job, write her book, and maintain a social life. On top of that Alice’s best friend, Mia, is currently being treated for a serious illness.

I grab her hand and ask her to please not be mad at me and tell her I promise to try harder and push myself. I cringe at how pathetic I sound. I wouldn’t act like this around anyone else. She doesn’t say anything, but she squeezes my hand and it isn’t for-giveness, but I’ll take what I can get. Usually, she’s tougher on me. I can tell she’s exhausted.


Jackson crafts a deeply emotional story that conveys a lot of weight implicitly through the actions of the characters and the words that were left unsaid between them. Reading the story there are many visual keys that I took note of, as it ties back to the cover of the book of hands. The description of hands and actions of characters using hands gives vivid imagery of the emotions that are trying to be conveyed in the scene. From scenes describing the flaking of nail polish, the size of a character’s hands, the wave of a hand brushing off a conversation, etc. It is hard to not notice these details as words contradict the action.

Another intricate detail of A Bit Much is the unsaid words and deafening silence shared between characters. These tense moments are blanketed by mundane conversations that do not hit any note of meaning. It is absolutely frustrating for me (in a good way) to see these characters just keep missing each other or keeping the words from being voiced out. There are so many moments of silence screaming with emotion backed with intent not fully taking form. This is what I love about Jackson’s writing as they paint a clear picture through the fine vivid intricacies and minimal meaningful conversations carefully placed throughout the book.

I miss him sometimes after he leaves, but only sometimes. I like to examine the faint violet bruises on my thighs left by fingerprints after sex. I study them, looking for patterns, like they can tell me something crucial about James and how he feels about me.


The characterization of the cast of characters introduced in A Bit Much is as close to reality as they can be, especially the main character Alice. As a twenty something year old myself I found a level of relatability in Alice. The struggles Alice is facing are some of those that any twenty something years old would face. The childhood relationships that grew apart with time but somehow linger, missed romantic opportunities, awkward dating experiences, the ups and downs of maintaining a relationship, and the balancing act between work, social life, dream, and romance. I spot myself in Alice multiple times in A Bit Much and I am sure future readers will too.

The way Jackson writes Alice’s thoughts and feelings did not drown me or feel suffocating in the slightest. A Bit Much is a story that focuses on mental illness and the toll it takes on a person, so in a way I expected to be affected in some way that I have to put the book down. But reading through the book there isn’t a moment when it was all too much for me. Jackson’s writing will put readers in a comfortable state of observation through the eyes of Alice.

“I know this is confusing because I’ve been telling you to write, and get out and go on dates, and then I freak out on you When you’re away. I can’t really explain it. It’s not your fault.” She pauses. “I just feel like I’m not going to get it back.” “Get what back?” Her eyes are blue vats in a web of inky red. I’ll never be able to understand what she’s feeling, and she knows it.


Though what makes A Bit Much different and unlike any book telling a story about a twenty something year old woman living in the city is Mia, Alice’s best friend. The relationship Alice has with Mia transcends an ordinary friendship. They have a deep symbiotic relationship. Alice and Mia are childhood friends that have grown up together, experiencing many significant moments in life together. Throughout the story Alice will reminisce on the memories in her life and in all these memories almost all involve Mia.

Mia’s illness affected Alice deeply from the start of the book until the very end. It manifested within Alice a deep sorrow and pain that took the form of destructive behaviour. And when things look like it is taking a turn for the better in Alice, there is a blooming guilt that stops Alice from experiencing her life. Jackson writes the friendship between Alice and Mia in a subtle yet meaningful way that will pull readers into the shared complex feelings. The weight of the elephant in the room felt lighter than it is supposed to be.

I’ve had a hard time forgetting it since. I know I have to focus on the black, but sometimes it isn’t possible. I worry about everything and everyone. I worry about living incorrectly. I think about conversations from years ago and wonder if I hurt some-one, gave them a complex, and maybe they’ve lost sleep fixating on the dumb thing I said. I worry my heart will stop working. I think about time passing as I lie awake, and the rest I’m miss-ing. I calculate the hours until I have to wake up and then I think about how I’ll never sleep and then I think about how tired I’ll be in the morning. I won’t sleep tonight.


A Bit Much is a book layered with emotion and tension that isn’t fully confronted. It is a book that highlights the unsaid, undiscussed, and brushed off moments in adulthood. Sarah Jackson shows how coming into adulthood it gets harder and harder to express feelings and confront the uncomfortable. Even when reality quickly catches up there are ways to make it avoidable. The story also highlights how mental illness affects parts of a person’s life and how debilitating it is. Jackson’s debut is clearly one of the most well crafted stories I’ve read that held my attention from the moment I cracked open the book to the very final page.

It is a book that I will recommend if you like stories about going through adulthood as a twenty something year old, dealing with grief and depression, and meaningful female friendships.
The Pachinko Parlour, by Elisa Shua Dusapin

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tense fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? N/A
  • Loveable characters? N/A
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

3.5

3.5/5 ⭐️

It’s not my fault, I think to myself, if I don’t tell them anything. If I can’t speak to them in Korean. I can’t help it if I live in Switzerland and speak French. I studied Japanese for their sakes. Because this is where they live and that’s what people speak here.


The Pachinko Parlour is a short quiet book that showcases Dusapin’s strength precise and delicate writing, conveying emotion and complex themes through mundanity.

The story of The Pachinko Parlour is laced with tension, minimal plot, and underlying eerie ominous tone. Dusapin shapes the story through the introduction of the characters : Claire, a half Korean and Switzerland woman in her 30s; Claire’s grandparents who own a pachinko parlour; Mieko, a young girl Claire tutors and Mieko’s mother. The story is told from the sole perspective of Claire as she spends her summer in Tokyo. Claire’s grandparents are Korean that have lived in Japan for years, running a small pachinko parlour that is also their home. Occasionally Claire goes to Mieko’s apartment teaching her french.

The plot is minimal so I would categorise The Pachinko Parlour as a quiet book. There are no big dramatic reveals or conflicts, just ordinary day to day occurrences during that one specific summer. Which led to me observing the characters that are complex in their behaviour and reactions to tension. This foreboding tension looms ominously is the background of each scene.

I force myself to stay awake, believing that nothing will change, nothing will age, so long as I’m not asleep. I feel trapped, the ground beneath me is poisoned, the earth’s crust itself as toxic as the liquid oozing from my ears.


As mundane as each scene is there is underlying urgency and reluctance emanating from all the characters. It is an oddly cinematic and emotional journey that clearly displays Dusapin’s precise way of writing. Dusapin builds this tension lightly as the story unfolds revealing the clear picture that points to home. Claire ruminates on the idea of belonging through reminiscing on her childhood visiting Japan and the connections that are waiting for her back in Geneva. She feels an obligation to commit with the plans but never finds it in herself to do so up until the climax. This also comes to other characters in the end that is satisfying to see.

Dusapin’s way of showing themes is through subtle anecdotes and passing conversations between characters. It is brilliant how Dusapin weaves topics such as the impact of the Korean war, the relationship between identity, culture, and language; the uncertainties of belonging as an immigrant family. Though this story focuses on a Korean-Switzerland girl, it is a relatable story that can resonate with many multi racial families.

All that lingers is an echo. A clamor of languages merging gradually to become one.


The Pachinko Parlour is my first time experiencing the simple and delicate writing style of Elisa Shua Dusapin. Sentences with no more than three to five words can resonate such impactful meaning that readers can feel the weight of Dusapin’s intent to convey emotion of each character. Finishing this gem of a book in one sitting is hugely satisfying for me. It is a nice short book that conveys complex characters and themes that don’t take a lot from readers to entangle. Personally, I loved the simplicity and mundanity of the story. I can certify that I will read Elisa Shua Dusapin’s next work in the near future.

Before I end my review I would like to applaud Aneesa Abbas Higgins for translating Dusapin’s prose into English. I am sure that the original text is beautiful in the language it is written in but what Aneesa did for The Pachinko Parlour is fabulous and I admire them for making this piece of literature accessible to more audiences. I highly recommend The Pachinko Parlour for readers that are looking for simple-one sitting kind of book and that are interested in quiet books. The low stakes and character focused stories that require minimal effort to consume.
The City We Became, by N.K. Jemisin

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adventurous funny tense fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

5.0

“Don’t sleep on the city that never sleeps, son, and don’t fucking bring your squamous eldritch bullshit here.”

The City We Became is a love letter to New York and to cities all over the world, to the culture that has progressed and grown with time, to the people that have lived and survived in it, and the greatest urban fantasy I’ve ever read.

In 2021, a short story I found on TOR’s website that I immediately devoured. This short story is The City Born Great by N. K. Jemisin. Lo and behold turns out this short story is the bare bones of N. K. Jemisin’s urban fantasy duology that has sat on my bookshelf for over a year, The City We Became. Knowing this got me excited to read the novel with high expectations and upon finishing my expectations are well met.
The City We Became is an urban fantasy with a mix of science fiction set in the city of New York. In this world, cities are living entities with a beating heart that grow from years of cultivation in culture and strong identities of its denizens. New York is a new born city that recently picked their avatar but during the birth something went horribly wrong. A sinister extraterrestrial being has interrupted the birth using new tricks that the other great cities didn’t expect.

Each city's birth is different and new every time. It is no different for New York as the city split itself into six avatars representing the five boroughs of New York: Manhattan, Queens, Brooklyn, Bronx, and Staten Island; and one primary avatar. Each borough’s avatar are real residents of New York that have been hand picked to defend the city from attacks of the elusive enemy. But first they must find each other, come up with a plan, and overcome their differences for New York. Though their enemy will stop at nothing to cut them at every turn.

“This is the lesson: Great cities are like any other living things, being born and maturing and wearying and dying in their turn.”

Looking at all my books there are a handful of urban fantasy books in the list. Almost all of these books are fantasy books that are set in an urban setting, which is the main reason why it’s called an urban fantasy. The City We Became is one of a few books that reimagines the city not just as a setting but as characters in the story. These major cities take the form of an avatar, the living embodiment of a city, representing the signature characteristic of that city.

For example the five boroughs of New York City : Manhattan is the borough where most of the Wall Street offices are, where money moves, and Manny’s powers manifest with anything relating to money or anything iconic about Manhattan; Brooklyn, home of some the most famous rappers in America, the avatar is a former MC. She uses her ability to write rhymes and her feel of rhythm as her weapon; Bronx is a lesbian artist Native American in her early sixties that trust nobody and tough as nails; Queens is a South Asian daughter of an immigrant family that is smart, adorable, and burning with the fight of the borough; Staten Island is an isolated young woman that is a product of environment she grew up in, close minded and easily influenced.
The other characters as well who are the avatars of other great cities such as Sao Paulo and Hong Kong also have distinct characteristics that embodies the city and their people. All these characters are unapologetically queer, incredibly diverse, and very well fleshed out. The individuality of each character is apparent on page, they all have their own voices that are just so THEM. Managing this many characters isn’t an easy feat but Jemisin does it with ease and finesse.

Though being an Indonesian myself I do not know all of the references Jemisin included throughout the story, I still enjoyed reading about it. Mainly because New York City is a place that I want to visit in my lifetime. All that aside readers will be treated with exciting details of history, culture, and geographical hot spots of New York City. Not just the usual touristy places but the places where history isn’t publicly known if readers aren’t attuned with the city.

“Come, then, City That Never Sleeps. Let me show you what lurks in the empty spaces where nightmares dare not tread.”

What makes the story stand out as well is that it is set in modern times of our world. The absolute excellence of Jemisin’s ability in writing to build a reimagined modern world, a city that they literally live in, weaving in an antagonist inspired by lovecraftian eldritch horror taking various forms of wickedness. The cultural references and historical context is written with utmost care and respect of a New Yorker for New York. The love Jemisin feels for New York bleeds through the characters, the world, and Jemisin’s writing.

While the city is the embodiment of a city, the enemy is the embodiment of a white out correction tape. By this I mean, an antagonist that champions uniformity, despises culture, diversity, and change in general. The attacks unleashed on the city are unlike any other fantasy book I’ve read such as gentrification, capitalism, white supremacy and so on. The battle scenes are hands down my favorite scenes in the book, as they incorporate vivid descriptions of identity and culture of a city in a game-like take down style that is equally satisfying and seething with excitement. I read a taste of the battle scenes in the short story version, it made me shed a few tears. Jemisin’s masterful ability in writing such addictive and electrifying prose will get readers heart pumping from start until the end.

“The city is different, because yesterday it was just a city, and today it is alive.”

The City We Became is an urban fantasy that is dripping with originality, heart pumping concrete jungle adventuring, diverse characters shining with personality, a balanced modern world that readers will free fall into laced with fantastical elements and lovecraftian inspiration, and a cross universe warfare that is epic in scale. This is the kind of book that is a work of art dedicated to Jemisin’s love of New York. Jemisin’s writing is colourful, incredibly vivid, filled with culture and history of the city.

It is a book I will recommend to people that want to dip their toe into adult fantasy for the first time. Even though it is a story that incorporates layers upon layers of world building, Jemisin writes an accessible story for any reader to sink their teeth into. The modern setting also would give a realistic note that can make future readers feel a sense of familiarity so they don’t need to remember a complex glossary while reading.


Book Lovers, by Emily Henry

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Did not finish book. Stopped at 40%.
DNF @ 50%

This book is too boring for me. The characters are plain and bland. The only good thing is the banter. Yet it gets boring the more you read because the plot is predictable. The conflict and plot progression isn't compelling nor interesting. There is no yearning at all nor the "rivals to lovers" trope that was promoted by the publisher. If you count being horny for each other as 'yearning' be my guest because for me there is nothing in this book that makes me want to continue it.
Acts of Service, by Lillian Fishman

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reflective fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? It's complicated
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.5

“You know, I don’t have any idea. I think that first I have to get the thing I want, and maybe then I can figure out why I wanted it. Or whether it’s good.”

Acts of Service is an exploration on the correlation between lust, sex, and power written with the alluring sultry prose of Fishman that will surely get you addicted in this stunning debut.

Acts of Service is a book that features a queer woman, Eve, that posted her nudes online on an anonymous website motivated by her vanity. Her post attracted a lot of attention from people but she doesn’t give them her attention. But somehow one comment caught her eye to the point of responding. Upon meeting said commentor, Olivia, Eve is offered with proposition that caught her off guard. From then on Eve starts a lustful and consensual relationship with Olivia and her boyfriend Nathan. This arrangement started of sexual but Eve’s curiosity on Olivia and Nathan’s relationship got her invested, involved, and addicted. Her fascination towards Olivia branches towards Nathan’s charisma that compelled her to do and be something more. It is an entanglement of passion, lust, and dripping with sex.

“What a pleasure it was to be obvious, even if what was obvious was nearly my body. I knew that it haunted women that their bodies were designated for sex. Even as an adolescnet I had know that. Had approached my body with fear as much as hope. Yet with Nathan I feel deep relief with how obvious it seemed to him that my body had a purpose, a nature, one that he could access naturally. […] In some way we had been brought up to be weary toward all women’s bodies.”

Lilian Fishman brings forth prose that flirts with readers in a sensual and curious manner. Inviting readers to come forth analyzing the complex tangled relationship between Eve, Olivia, and Nathan. For the most part readers are welcomed into Eve’s mind. Her thoughts starts of curious and concerned that grew to become lustful, invested, and sometimes drunk of her addiction to be lusted upon.

She completely surrenders herself to Nathan like prey to predator. It changed the course of her motive that solely focused on Olivia at first to a man that knows how to wield his abilities to pleasure Eve subduing her to his control. It is addicting to witness as a reader how Eve comes to form a relationship with Nathan that is no longer just business but with affection and attentiveness of real lover. But its important to note this relationship started off with agency of pleasure and desire.

During the beginning Fishman’s way of writing pulled me in as the story progresses but then towards the middle I became less interested as the story plateaus until the very end. It didn’t feel like there is more to Eve’s nuance thoughts about her situation as she just comes to term with it, falling into the arrangement that gives her a lot of pleasure. The sudden conflict that is left unresolved added in the last two chapters was a big change of pace that didn’t make quite sense.

There are discussions about relationships, power dynamics, consent, agency, and manipulation. It is an alluring concept of manipulation that hides lies behind false assurances and promises of pleasure. By the time you start reading it is really hard to put down this book as Lilian Fishman will keep you glued to her magnetic way of story telling. There is pleasure even in toxic relationships with unhealthy dynamics but it is a choice Eve have committed herself towards.

“A life knows that it needs a shape and, taking cues from films and lives it has glimpsed, chooses a core around which to bend itself. A life recognizes the theater in which its keeper appears most real.”


Final thoughts, Acts of Service is a good debut book that introduces Lilian Fishman’s strength as a writer to craft a compelling story with luscious prose and interesting themes. I really enjoyed reading about Eve as she navigates through her life as a twenty-something woman in New York that is just enjoying her life as she follows her instinct and desire. I genuinely think that I am at that point in my life that stories like Eve’s really intrigue me. Though my life is completely different from Eve’s it is a fun thing to live vicariously through her.

Chlorine, by Jade Song

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dark fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? N/A
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

4.0

4/5 ⭐️

Trigger warning : self harm, mutilation, sexual assault

Back then, I was a girl, a body of water, a liminal state of being, a hybrid on the cusp of evolution. Now, I am Ren Yu. I am 人鱼 . I am person fish. I am mermaid. And so goes my tale of becoming. Are you ready?


ARC provided by the publisher William Morrow through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Chlorine is a fantastic debut book of up and coming writer Jade Song. The story is a modern and twisted coming of age mermaid inspired story about a competitive swimmer, Ren Yu, as she attempts to reach the expectations of her immigrant mother all the while going through puberty and achieve swimming greatness under the brutal coaching of a demanding trainer. It is a story that highlights the pressures of being a teenager struggling coming to terms with womanhood and shouldering the expectations of a high achieving student trying to please everyone in their life.

Ren, being an immigrant's daughter with a father that lives in a different continent, is shaped to become the person everyone influential in her life expected her to be. Though Ren herself doesn't know who she wants to become; her identity is put on the shelf multiple times as she is put under enormous pressure. Song writes Ren's story with masterful skill pushing Ren slowly to the edge with incredibly engaging prose. The slow ascent to unhinged madness as Ren is whipped to reality by the disappointments of her coach, peers, and family; pushes her to embrace the identity formed by her delusions.

You must know by now my mermaid tale is no such joyful narrative. And you would not be interested in this story if it were.


Ren's obsession to achieve perfection, shown through how strict she follows her regimen given by her swim coach, is a gradual process in her characterization. It is reminiscent of movies such as Whiplash and Black Swan. There are many parallels that I've found in Chlorine with these movies such as the demanding and ruthless tutor, the immense pressure from all parts of the main character's life, and the obsession that came to a boiling point of explosive outcomes. The way Song describes the atmosphere in Chlorine is the foundation that perfectly sets the tone of the story. It is undeniably addictive how Song crafted Ren's journey weaving in the factors that are relevant and close to real life.

For me as a reader I completely relate to Ren and her family. She comes from an immigrant background with a family originating from China living in America. It is a story that hits close to home for me as it is something I have gone through similarly in my life. I'd say Chlorine is such a great depiction of it, minus the eventual climax of the story. The references of Mandarin pop songs and nostalgic Chinese films is on point that it put a smile on my face as I grew up consuming those medias too. Some readers might think that these pop culture references are cringe or irrelevant to a story but for Chlorine it became a staple in Ren's characterization to add depth (as I find a commonality between me and Ren through these references).

But I was meant to be selfish—my self, meeting the fish. In a way, my breaking compounded my ascendancy, though it was never I who did the actual breaking. It was my head, the people, and the systems around me.


Chlorine is a love letter to mermaids and its various interpretations, legends, and myth of the story. From the happiest versions of the story to its darkest versions. Ren fell in love with the idea of mermaids when she was just a child. That love only became stronger as Ren found many signs that pointed to her identity. At first Ren denies these fantasies but then she embraces it when she is under pressure. The comfort these stories about mermaids has given Ren became her escape from reality to a point of no return. And through these stories Ren develops a coping mechanism to comfort herself that she will achieve perfection. After she fell from the pressures of her life it led Ren to completely pursuing perfection with maniacal madness until the idea struck true.

The evolution of Ren's characterization is satisfying to read from start to end. Song's ability to write Ren's logic is incredibly immersive as it is equally disturbing and awe striking how it all made sense even though deep inside it is balls to the walls unhinged. I would like to dissect Song's writing process because through reading the book I am just so immersed and engaged word for word. I liked what Song was selling and I completely bought it. Seeing the final form of Ren's characterization being shaped as each monumental moment moulded her thinking and the identity that she wants blew me away. It is a display of Song's ability as a writer to craft a story that is high quality. It's been a while since a book drowned me in the fantasy that I could not look away.

As I write, I feel the same fire from that streamline perimeter walk, relighting itself inside me, licking, inside my core, a slow smolder, a wholly different sensation from the numbing conflagration brought by streamline and the irritation of chlorine on skin—the feeling you give me is more like embers. Glowing.


The other characters that became a fundamental part of Ren's transformation and growth are written with equal care. Song's intent to push Ren through the side characters was so deliberate and precise. There are goosebumps all over as I see the shift in Ren's conscience and demeanour taking effect. One of the side characters that is a tool in helping Ren is her best friend, Cathy. Their relationship is one of the highlights of the story for me. I love how Song weaved in a sapphic plot line through Cathy. She has been loyal to Ren ever since they were young and she continued to be so up until the end. In a way Cathy enabled Ren's fantasy to become a reality as a result of her infatuation and loyalty. Cathy's longing for Ren's affection is intense and palpable that the tension is so high, as a reader I could feel it through my bones.

Final thoughts, Chlorine is a solid stand out debut that is immersive and atmospheric that is worthy of a movie adaptation. I presume Song's background in art direction plays a big part in their ability to write a vivid story. For readers that are curious about what the mood is like for Chlorine I suggest checking out the mood board Song has made on Instagram, check out @chlorinenovel. Chlorine has become one of my most anticipated debuts in 2023, I can't wait for people to read Jade Song's writing. Please support by pre-ordering or requesting Chlorine at your nearest library because this book has exceeded my expectations. If you like stories about obsessed competitive athletes, with stories about mermaids scattered throughout, lots of sapphic yearning, and lots of unhinged moments, definitely pick this book up.

The quotes in this review were taken from an ARC and are subject to change upon publication.

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Love in the Big City, by Sang Young Park

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funny lighthearted sad medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

4.0

Stoner, by John Williams

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reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? N/A
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? N/A

3.75

My Brilliant Friend, by Elena Ferrante

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reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? N/A
  • Loveable characters? N/A
  • Diverse cast of characters? N/A
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? N/A

4.0