morebedsidebooks's reviews
350 reviews

Secondhand Origin Stories by Lee Blauersouth

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3.0


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The Potion Gardener by Arden Powell

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5.0


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Grim Reflection by A. Lawrence

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4.5


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Ending the Pursuit: Asexuality, Aromanticism, and Agender Identity by Michael Paramo

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4.0


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Something Spectacular by Alexis Hall

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2.5


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The Annotated Arabian Nights: Tales from 1001 Nights by Anonymous

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4.0

The Annotated Arabian Nights represents a of selection of folktales from what is (without the orientalist moniker) properly titled the One Thousand and One Nights, giving a sample of a newer contemporary translation by Yasmine Seale alongside analysis. 

Although this book does not quite reflect Seale’s thinking on the Nights, her translation is engaging and clear in attention to cadence, rhyme, especially verse, and the voice of Shahrazad. While, like her visual poem “Sleepless” of Shahrazad’s waking eye, illuminating texts for modern audiences and up out of previous liberties taken by many. A labor sure to produce something glorious when that edition arrives in full. In the time being, the Annotated Arabian Nights is an immense book more suited to coffee tables and academic interest.

See an in-depth review on my blog. 


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Written In Blood by Caroline Graham

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Sable Dark by Al Hess

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4.0


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Mazarin Blues by Alia Hess

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3.75


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Violent Phenomena: 21 Essays on Translation by Jeremy Tiang, Kavita Bhanot

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4.0

Violent Phenomena: 21 essays on Translation is an anthology of writing by 24 contributors featuring a breadth of personal experience with culture, language, translation, publishing, and grappling with colonial and imperial legacies. As the introduction puts it ‘Above all this book is a challenge to inherited assumptions about translators and translations being neutral, making the case that every aspect of translation is political.’ 

If one has an interest in translation and decolonisation pick up this book. 

 


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