Reviews

Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury

kaeliesreads's review against another edition

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1.0

I read this book for school my sophomore year of high school

pavreads's review against another edition

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5.0

¡Que libro tan extraño! Pero también ¡que libro tan bueno!
Acabo de descubrir que termine el libro hace tres días, porque no me había dado cuenta de que esta edición contaba con un par de cuentos del autor. Ya se, que tonta, pero el final de libro se me hizo tan incompleto que enserio pensé que esas 70 páginas que me hacían falta seguían siendo parte de la historia de Montag, pero habían unas hojas en blanco en el primer cuento que evitaban que siguiera avanzando. Fue apenas hoy, 11 de sept. que me dí cuenta que en la contra-portada te dice que es una edición especial con contenido extra.. (DUH!)

Disfruté muchísimo la historia, el mundo que se invento Bradbury me pareció tan intenso y original que disfruté cada página, todo el contexto es impresionante. Me hizo falta mas.
Muy buen libro, no me esperaba algo así.

paulopaperbooksonly's review against another edition

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4.0

Fanhereit 459 it's an odd book. I can't figure if I liked it or not. I enjoy reading a book about alternative history, dystopian and post-apocalpytic fiction and this one inserts alongside "1984", "We" or "Brave New World" but this one is a little difference. The author doesn't focus much on the politics and briefly we are told why the world change the way it change but even that is so scarce that it didn't quenched my thirst. In this point it was a let down. I really hope for more.

This edition have an introduction and afterwords by the author were he tells us a bit how he became a writer and how this book came to be. I always enjoy introductions by the authors specially the ones that try to explain something of the novel.

This novel was first published in a shorter form called The Fireman, later Ray tried to enlarge the story and by what I learn it was sold first to the playboy magazine. The title comes from the temperature need to paper to get burn which is at 450 degrees which gives around 850 Fanhereit degrees.

The main character is Guy Montag, a fireman (in this future he doesn't put out fires but instead is a book burner. We learn in the beginning of the (to-be)society full of hedonistic anti-intellectual. America is a lawless state where teenagers are violent and to other horrific grotesque pleasures like watching animals die. Reading is prohibit and anyone who is catch are put in a mental hospital and the books burnt (specially important authors).One day Montag meets a neighbour (Clarisse) with free-thinking ideals which makes him question his ideals and hapiness and life. Montag after arriving home and finding his wife full of pills and the "saving" by some technicians makes Montag question about society. In a following day they go to a house full of books where a old inflammes herself before the firemen do it. This also disturbed montag. In that "raid" he also snatch a book.

Montag calls for a sick leave and receives the captain of the fire team who explains the political and social causes that are tie in with their work.

We learn that the reason that there aren't so many books it's because society in search for hapiness and minimize cultural offences supress the literature through an act of self-censorship. He also says that all firemen passes what he is passing, even stealing a book out of curiosity. It's also implied that he knows montag had stolen a book. We learn eventually that Montag had been stealing books for a while having dozen books in the house. The reason is that he is trying to memorize the books but is failing the quest because the words escape him. He then remembers Faber, professor who helps him understand books but also with a ear-piece. He travels back to his work and after a card game they are called to a house.. Montag house. Here Beatty confronts him and tells him to burn his house because he knows of he's doing. Montag instead burns Beatty and runs away.

There is chase broadcast in TV as a spectacle (to distract people from on the oncoming threat of war). He goes to Faber house who tells him of vagabonds who roam the land and they are also book-lovers who preserv books orally. He escapes afterwards toward the river and the mechanical hound chasing losses his scent. He arrives at an encampent of these book lovers who make him watch in a TV that even if he escape another "montag" was capturerd and we watch the hound capture another person, probably scapegoat.

The book ends with Montag seeing bombers flying overhead and a nuclear explosion of the city he lived. Mildred died but Faber supposedly moves to another city. We are left with a optimistic ending that as a phoenix society must also rise from his ashes with the help of the book-lovers.

As I said, this book is a odd book. I liked reading and read it rapidly. But at the same time I hoped that more information about the society would have been given. But in overall I

understand it's value and why it seats along 1984 or Brave New World.

Recommend? To anyone.

xxgeexx2312's review against another edition

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3.0

I’m glad I read this as I like to read some of “the classics” and the ideas I can see why are good for a high school class discussion I just didn’t find it as profound as it should have been, I don’t know I just felt like I wanted to love it more than I actually did when reading.

ranas_books's review against another edition

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challenging dark hopeful reflective sad tense fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.5

Fascinating read. What would happen to a world without books, without debates, without difference of opinions? Montag thought he would be happy, he was not. This is a story where you have an open ending that could take you anywhere, and it doesn't matter, because this is really all about what has happened more than what's going to happen. I really enjoyed reading and thinking about this book.

williamscummings22's review against another edition

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3.0

3.5. (Reread) Very good, but I find Clarice a bit annoying, and it kinda implies that the only medium that contains worth and meaning is books, which isn’t true. It’s also kinda too short.

karasmichelle's review against another edition

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5.0

Short and to the point. Through the mind of "fireman" Guy Montag we find a bleak future in which censorship breeds the unimaginative. Makes me want to stop wasting time and ... keep on reading. Bradbury wrote this in 9 days.

leaton01's review against another edition

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3.0

I always grapple with this book. I've read it and taught it a few times over the years. In terms of storytelling, it's enjoyable. We follow Montag, a firefighter of the future whose role is to find and destroy written works--particular books. Of course, Montag finds some level of corruption in the system he works for and he, himself, is eventually seduced to keep a book. This simultaneously opens up a new world of consideration for him to come to understand why the world has decided that books are threats to one's mind and also puts in direct conflict with his work and a threat to those around him. So the story explores his departure from mainstream society to marginalized society with the sense that this less-road traveled is more important (which given that road is book-reading and one is actually reading a book to discover the story adds a nice meta element to the story).

While the book does have one of the finest first sentences to start a novel ("It was a pleasure to burn."), it's politics feels a bit heavy-handed and like much of Bradbury's work--a bit too nostalgic for the past while also maintaining an uncritical technopanic frame about the future of society and technology (not that being critical of technology isn't important, but much of his feels lazy rather than thoughtful). Pitting televisual media (TVs and movies) against the book feels flat philosophically as much as it did when Socrates told us to beware of writing is a technology that could threaten the truth and reality of his time. Even now, while people look to the book and say, "See that's what happening now"--they seem to inherently forget that disinformation and misinformation that causes many modern ills are the result of reading and writing a lot; so the idea that knowledge in books will be burned away or deleted feels less realistic a hook than the idea that it would be drowned out. While it's a fun book to read, if looking knowledge dystopia, Brave New World and 1984 do it much more powerfully.

givli's review against another edition

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adventurous dark funny inspiring reflective tense fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? N/A

4.0

asylumteaparty's review against another edition

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4.0

A relatively short story, but captivating. In a society where fireman starts fire instead of putting them out, fireman Guy Montague starts to question his own beliefs and the society he lives in. The book is a good commentary on society and how much power we should give to those who rule, but at the same time the story in itself is exciting.