walkonpooh's review

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4.0

In light of the events in Batman, Inc. #8, this was a really interesting read. It seems like the idea of the book was to focus on the relationship between Bruce Wayne/Batman and Damian Wayne/Robin and well, given the recent events, that's not likely going forward.

So it was interesting to read this in the midst of the events of Batman, Inc. #8, I started reading this before that news came out and I finished it after I read Batman, Inc. #8. It was interesting to see another writers take on the character and while of course Grant Morrison writes Damian Wayne better than any other writer, I thought Tomasi's version was pretty good and true to the character.

I liked how the story tied into Bruce's past and also Damian's. Nobody was an interesting villain, though if I had any criticism, it would have been nice if they would have added a little bit of mystery to his character. Though, I guess that would be more reserved for Detective Comics. Anyway, it will be interesting to see where this title goes in the future given recent events, I would have definitely been more interested in reading this on a more regular basis, had that thing not happened, but it seems kind of out of Tomasi's hands. What was written here was a very solid Batman story!

captwinghead's review

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4.0

I hovered between a 3 and a 4. There's nothing wrong with this book, exactly. I've just read better books about Bruce and Damian's relationship.

I really like the chemistry Damian has with the Batfam. He's a little brother to Tim, Cass and Dick. (And probably Jay as well but I haven't really read them interacting). He's a son/grandson to Alfred who seems to have the least expectations for Damian and just accepts him as he is. I think their relationship is really great because it highlights the problems with Bruce and Damian's relationship.

Bruce wants Damian to be more like him. He wants him to adopt the Batman's principles the way Dick and Tim did (for the most part) and turn away from his training (similar to Cass). Instead, similar to Jason, Damian is having a hard time with that. Partly, in my opinion, because Bruce keeps him in the dark a lot.

I don't make excuses for Damian's behavior but I think it's important that he's trying. His story is a redemption arc as he tries to make up for 9 years of upbringing with Talia, Ra's and the League of Assassins. It took a while but Dick saw that and Alfred saw that. This book is Bruce coming around to seeing that.

Anyway, NoBody wasn't a bad villain. He had a pretty interesting backstory and understood why he wanted to kill Bruce. The fact that he was willing to torture and kill a 10 year old was horrifying. That was painful to read and I really felt for Bruce.

That moment where Damian makes a choice (won't spoil it) reminded me of the scene where Cass fights David Cain and has to make a similar choice. The dichotomy between her and Damian is really fascinating to me.

Anyway, I think if you like Damian and are interested in his relationship with Bruce, this might be somewhat interesting. However, as I said above, there are better books I can recommend.

lina_the_faerie's review

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5.0

The relationship between Druce and Damian is beautifully done. Two peas in a pod that do not understand how similar they are.

the_graylien's review

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4.0

So Batman and Robin made it to The New 52. That's good news. The placement of Bruce Wayne's son Damian Wayne as Robin was one of my favorite things as I read through the wrap up of the old DCU Batman titles.

Only here, it's even better.

In the old DCU, it was Dick Grayson as Batman and Damian as Robin, now it's a father and son dynamic duo, as Bruce and Damian take to the streets to bring the hurt to the bad guys.

The father and son dynamic should be interesting enough to get you to pick this one up and give it a chance. I mean, IT'S BATMAN'S SON! HOW COOL IS THAT?! Also, Damian's a great character. He's a 10 year old little prick, but he'd also an absolute bad-ass, having been trained since the age of 3 by the al-Ghul family League of Assassins. There are times you want to hate him, there are times you think he's the coolest ever.

The creative team of Peter J. Tomasi and Patrick Gleason have made their mark on the DCU, churning out quality stories on Green Lantern Corps, among other titles. Their work shines again in this volume, as the story is page-turningly effective with very nice art.

I've yet to be truly disappointed by The New 52, but this title is one I'd definitely recommend for anyone wanting to take a taste.

henryarmitage's review

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4.0

This is novel... Robin is Damien, Bruce's son.
Anyway, good one.

nike13's review

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4.0

I'm still in my Damien kick for comics, very good story with villain Nobody as Damien tries to control his rage and meet his father's expectations.

Only thing that lowered the score on this is the fact that I have trouble enjoying the artwork when getting the Hardcover collections. Yes, I could've waited til the paperback version came out or gotten the separate issues but both of those would've meant a longer wait and like Damien, my patience isn't that good.

stevenk's review

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3.0

I received the book for free through Goodreads First Reads giveaways. Unlike the other New 52 titles from DC that I have read this one was not a reboot (other than the new Batman Costume) and was therefore a bit more confusing as a jumping on point. I hadn't read anything with Damian Wayne as Robin in it so it was a little hard to get into the character and his history with Bruce Wayne, which is half of the reason for the tension between Batman and Robin in this book. The art had a dark quality that fit well with the storyline, but had it's highs and lows, some panels were great and some were a little off. And while the violence was appropriate for the story, I won't be letting my kids read this one until they are out of elementary school (although they saw it come in the mail and really want to read it).

brandysith's review

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4.0

Part of my joy of reading this book came from the fact that I had to wait so long to get to it. (Dishonor on those who do not return their library books).

I'm pretty unfamiliar with Damian Wayne, but that didn't stop me from being interested in the series. Likewise, anyone else who isn't familiar with Damian or his past shouldn't shy away, because the comic does a fine job of explaining his back story through the narration (in a typical comic flashback kind of way).

While it seems like the story is about the new villain, Nobody, at the core, it is really a father/son story, and a good one at that. They don't hate each other, but they don't understand each other (spoiler, I stole that line from the comic), and that's an interesting way to take on this kind of story.

booknooknoggin's review

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4.0

Another great Batman and Robin. Have to say that Damian is my favorite Robin,just because he is conflicted and this book really focused on that.

nerdyscrivener's review

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4.0

I love this series. Robin is so messed up making for such an good story. can't wait to read the rest.