Reviews

From #blacklivesmatter to Black Liberation, by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

amckiereads's review against another edition

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4.0

This book was great, but ultimately I wanted a bit more. I think it was strongest in its last chapters. In the earlier chapters it covers a lot, quickly, and I felt it could have used more explanations for some of the history. This may be in part because I've read full length books on most of the first chapters and so these overviews felt too short. That being said, the shorter length will, I hope, make it more accessible to more readers. I would still recommend it to all as required reading.

txfu's review against another edition

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4.0

As a political strategy book on how to achieve Black liberation via intersectional working-class solidarity, I would say it's lukewarm, but that's fine with me- I did not pick this up anticipating a comprehensive, cohesive, cogent strategy for the future of the BLM movement.

As a historical and political analysis book that economically details the events and conditions that led to the genesis of the Black Lives Matter movement during the Obama presidency, this was a fantastic. I have either studied or knew of most of the historical events/developments contributing to the racial oppression in this nation that were referenced, but had not connected them as creating and upholding structural racism until recent years (with the aid of lucid, deft writers like Keaanga-Yamahtta Taylor). What this book newly articulated for me was the failure of having "Black faces in high places" in fundamentally improving the lives of Black working class people. The hope that went into believing that if Black elected officials were leading Black communities, if the community finally has power over itself, then that guaranteed brighter futures ahead. And what came out on the other side of Black electoral success: a different, perhaps more insidious, way to uphold and re-entrench the very systems Black communities thought they could change and be free from by electing Black representatives and leaders. I didn't realize I needed new language for the deep cynicism that I've developed around treating a singular focus on channeling political energy into voter registration and having non-white representation in electoral politics as a panacea for inequality, when it's at best a sorely inadequate proxy for the social, economic, and political change needed to eradicate anti-black racism and at worst a deliberate distraction from the policies and practices that could be truly transformational for Black liberation

schomj's review against another edition

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5.0

All the stars.

I wish I'd read this a few years ago when I first got it. It has provided a lot of clarity about so many things.

robinsky's review against another edition

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5.0

absolut super gutes buch ich hab das gefühl ich hab n viel besseres verständnis von rassismus und wie der interlocked mit kapitalismus ist und vorallem das letzte kapitel das sich mit beispielsweise weißen arbeitern vs schwarzen arbeitern auseinandersetzt ist seeehr interessant zu lesen!!!

cgcpoems's review against another edition

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4.0

I came to this book with the intention of wanting to learn more about not only BLM, but the way it intersects & interacts with what's already happened in our history; I was not disappointed. Taylor made very compelling arguments and statements, had many sources to back those up, & gave a full picture of racism in America (particularly in today's world, after the events of Ferguson). I'd recommend this to anybody that's serious about learning what BLM stands for, & how significant it really is.

autumntree07's review against another edition

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5.0

This was an absolute great read! I recommend this book for anyone who is wanting to understand the present issues of race in America with clear research and connections to history.

stevia333k's review against another edition

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5.0

This book basically answers the question of why young leftists these days have been increasingly ML instead of anarchist. This is a good book. However, this book being published 2016 May, it's somewhat weird considering how we've had uprisings in 2020.

jamiecoughlin's review against another edition

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5.0

Incredibly thorough analysis of our current moment (published in 2016), how we got here, why this movement is happening now, and where it can (and must) go from here. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor is the truth.

deveyway's review against another edition

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challenging dark emotional informative inspiring reflective tense medium-paced

5.0

indalauryn's review against another edition

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5.0

Very thorough look at social and freedom movements throughout the centuries and their culmination to the Ferguson uprisings. Taylor provides a timeline around these movements, why they occur, and why they ultimately struggle to become more than moments when they are quelled by state forces without any real long-time substantial change. Definitely one for the curriculum.