Reviews

Ender's Game, by Orson Scott Card

hjortron's review against another edition

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5.0

Even though I'd previously watched the movie it was a captivating read, and a spectacular ending which makes it worthy of being the classic it is.

kairosdreaming's review against another edition

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5.0

You don't have to like Card to recognize that this is a superb piece of writing. Reading this book has always been powerful to me. You get hooked in from the first page and it's hard to put it down after that. And it's great that it could be read as a standalone, but is part of a series in case you want to continue Ender's story.

Ender is a brilliant child. So much so in fact that he was specifically bred to take part in a program designed for gifted kids. You see, families aren't allowed to have more than two children on future Earth, but Ender's family was given special permission to have him. When at first they remove his monitor though, he think he's flunked out. But time shows that he is about to be groomed to become a commander of the fleet. The buggers are a constant threat in humanity's eyes and the school Ender is sent to, floating in space, is specifically designed to train to neutralize that threat.

Ender is a fantastic character. He is relatable even though he is a substantial amount smarter than your average person. And he has so much going against him and so much expected of him. You're right there with him with his pressures, frustrations, and triumphs. All of the other characters pale beside him, yet they are still complete because they serve a purpose in a way. Especially his brother and sister, who enter into politics and discussion and play their own games. He also has several interesting classmates that play the games with him and they too are incredibly smart. Although some of them can be quite vicious.

From my description you'd probably think this is an action book. But that's just because I can't fully explain the themes and details in such a short time, you'd really need to read the book to get the full experience. It does have action. But it also has political commentary, social morality and lessons about making hard choices in life and the consequences of them. There are gritty details and violence. It's not a pleasant book at all. But it's one that will make you think. And it's so well written that the pace, characters and setting draw you in and don't let you go.

One of my favorite books that I've read and one that I could read over and over. If you've never read the book, or if you've only seen the movie, make sure that you read it, it's well worth it.

Enders Game
Copyright 1985
368 pages

Review by M. Reynard 2015

More of my reviews can be found at www.ifithaswords.blogspot.com

reginacattus's review against another edition

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5.0

As often happens, I watched the movie before I borrowed my father's old copy and read it. It's really worth reading. Orson Scott Card deftly directs you to see through Ender's eyes, as well as those of everyone around him. I think it's better in book format because there isn't such a rush to fit it all in. It doesn't focus too much on anything insignificant, but has a nice pace to it. Just as Ender feels empathises with his enemies, you empathise with each character. It also gives you a much better idea of how very young Ender is, whilst at the same time leading you to forget it thanks to his incredible maturity. I really envy the Wiggin children their excellence, and it was awful to feel Ender's disillusionment with his existence, and his over-whelming guilt.

ury949's review against another edition

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3.0

I liked the themes of treating life as a game, or treating a game as the most important thing in one's life. This was a very forest for the trees sort of message about why we take some things so seriously and obsess over the things we do. The ending, with the message from the aliens, however, seemed really silly and irrelevant. The book could have ended after the final game - but I suppose it plays into the other books that follow it... I'm not interested in reading them.

caspian's review against another edition

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adventurous challenging dark emotional sad slow-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? It's complicated
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0


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a_ab's review against another edition

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3.0

There is a lot to like here (mostly the themes and their exploration through narrative), a lot to skip or be bored by (the battles) and a glaring flaw that completely sours the whole book (the typical undisguised misogyny).
The only way I was able to disregard the later is through reading the whole thing as a cautionary tale of what a male-dominated world inevitably leads to. It's a very convoluted interpretation, unlikely to have been intended by the author, but it allowed me to finish the book, which I ultimately do not regret.

ksoccell24's review against another edition

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4.0

Incredible sci fi universe and thrilling storyline. However, not suitable for children, full of swearing and crude jokes.

otisbuster's review against another edition

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adventurous tense fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.75

euphrates21's review against another edition

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adventurous dark emotional tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? It's complicated
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.75

pbanditp's review against another edition

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4.0

It begs the question of how far will we go for hypothetical peace? Ender is a genius, and a child. The book starts when he is six years old and at the finale he is 12. Bullying and manipulation are Ender’s teachers. Friends are turned to enemies and isolation due to jealousy create the leader that the politicians think they want. Is it worth it in the end? Are the Buggers all that we should fear?
This book is filled with metaphors and lessons.