moonchildallen's review against another edition

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hopeful informative inspiring reflective fast-paced

5.0

daksh29's review against another edition

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medium-paced

4.5

sab_j's review against another edition

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emotional informative reflective slow-paced

3.0

lorenzana's review against another edition

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3.0

Reading this book, I expected it to fulfill my expectation that being 'hated' was the signifier of one living to one's own principles. And while it did do that, it brought so much more to the table.

The incorporation of Adler's ideas truly carries this book to the next level in terms of truly living a good and free life. With an emphasis on the subjectivity of the world, it encouraged me to reconsider the very things that I value.

It thus brings a new perspective to how we can view the world by saying: our power as humans is immeasurable. We can change the whole world by changing ourselves.

ainiali's review against another edition

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5.0

This is something that takes a lot to digest but enlightening at the same time. I need to read/listen to this again soon!

tinito's review against another edition

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3.0

Wasn't really happy with the false marketing in this book. It is written by Japanese authors, yes, but it's largely (solely?) based on Alfred Adler's individual psychology. And Adler was Austrian. So what is the Japanese phenomenon? The writing style (attempting to go for the style of Plato's Republic?) is kind of painful to get through but it had some interesting (while unoriginal) thoughts. There is some value here even with the shortcomings if one is not interested in reading Adler's original works. 2.5-3 stars maybe.

habibaelsaadany_'s review

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informative inspiring medium-paced

4.0

efram's review

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5.0

The Courage to be Disliked's rate of harmonious five stars is a sign of my high regards with the entirety of this book. This should be read by every individual evidently because all of us have our discontented version of ourselves still clinging with the traumas of the past, shackling our capability of changing ourselves for the better. My high recommendation targets those who question the significance of their life; live for others.

The strengths of the book are its serenely refreshing writing, exceptional characterization that engages the reader with its absolute concept of life's discontentment generating confusion before concluding with charming realizations, top-notch usage of Adlerian theory philosophically and psychologically, superb use of dialogue to diminish the imposing display of self-help, accomplished referencing to explain each and every themes, and lastly, the beauty of community feeling; happiness for others.

izuku's review

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The first words after the title pages were "Sigmund Freud" and it was only downhill from there.

keelinreads's review against another edition

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informative reflective medium-paced

1.0