Reviews tagging 'Ableism'

With You Forever by Chloe Liese

15 reviews

valeria_gzz's review against another edition

Go to review page

emotional funny lighthearted medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

5 MOTHERFREAKING STARS. 

I am kinda mad that there wasn’t a sort of epilogue in this book though because I wanted to know more about Olly’s book. 

I loved reading this so so much, it was hot, it was cute and once again I LOVE IT. This was basically Ren and Frankie’s book but reverse the genders and add in a marriage of convenience. I love it when a couple is made up of an either quiet and/or introverted person and then an extroverted funny/popular/always happy person it’s my kryptonite

Expand filter menu Content Warnings

decklededgess's review against another edition

Go to review page

funny hopeful lighthearted relaxing fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? It's complicated
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

trigger warnings: chronic illness, sexual content, autism related triggers, abandoned animals, artist's block, 

I have been waiting on a romance series that will put me in a chokehold a la Bridgertons but like /better/ and here we have it. Something about sibling dynamics throughout romance series where you get to anticipate future siblings finding their HEA and also seeing snippets of elder siblings living their loving HEA lives just UGHHHHH hits the spot.

Axel and Rooney were just chefs kiss. The marriage of convenience, there's only one bet, grumpy and sunshine, pet loving, smushy gushy idiots in love shit is jist SEfkjdhrgkjshelrgehrlg. It's really not something I can put into articulate words so y'all just gotta read it and join me in my cry fest of these soft baby Bergmans.

Expand filter menu Content Warnings

kim03's review against another edition

Go to review page

emotional hopeful inspiring lighthearted
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes

4.5

 This book was such a delight. And in my eyes, it showed how talented a writer Chloe Liese is. 

There were so many things I loved, so let’s start with the characters: Rooney Sullivan, the sunshine in this sunshine & Grump romance, has a chronic illness which forces her to take time off of college / university (not sure right now) and spend some time away. He friend, Willa suggests the A-Frame, a vacation home of sorts belonging to the Bergman family which Rooney is an honorary member of. Axel Bergman, the grump half of the sunshine & grump romance, is currently renovating the A-frame, but he needs the money from an inheritance which requires him to be married. 

The following could contain spoilers. Be aware.
Next up I want to differentiate between what I liked about the book and what I disliked, minus the latter, because this book is simply flawless (my opinion). 

The most important thing for me was how… respectful and consensual this relationship felt like. I’ve read the first three books in this series to, and this is a recurring thing, namely that the characters are so different yet love each other because of that and respect each other. Moreover, it was so wonderful to see them respect each other from the start and then grow comfortable and vulnerable with each other. 

Chloe Liese´s writing style is like the cherry on top. She can write three dimensional characters that I always find relatable, that I always find a piece of myself in; she also just has a very special way of conveying emotions, both the happy, warm and fuzzy ones and the sad and hurting ones. And let’s not forget the entirely realistic portrait of sibling relationships, the self-explanatory diversity (example: Axel is autistic; the book is an #OwnVoices story), existence of boundaries and feminism, and destruction of toxic masculinity (and heteronormativity, in a way). 

 

Here are the content warnings I’ve found: chronic illness (inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis), some Ableism, absent parents and unhealed childhood trauma, mental illness, medical content 

The tropes: sunshine & grump; marriage of convenience 

The songs that were stuck in my head while reading: “People Watching” by Conan Grey //// "Till Forever Falls Apart" by Ashe and Finneas

And here are some of my favorite quotes: 

 “For the hearts that love differently, and the hearts that love them for it.” (Dedication)

 “She was hurting. And I didn’t want her to hurt anymore. I didn’t want her to hurt ever.” (Chapter 4) 

 “He's still wearing his ring. And the hand that wears it is splayed wide, like a fist he just unclenched and flexed.” (Chapter 9; this is only here because of the Pride and Prejudice vibes)

 “The deeper you love, the deeper the risk of disappointment, and hurt, and loss. The more you care, the more pain you might face. And yet, I hope you won’t always let that stop you. […] Fear of failure, fear of not living up to these standards you hold yourself to, which sound pretty damn high. Because… well, have you ever considered that the depth of feeling for the subject is the reason you´re the very best person to paint it?” (Chapter 9)

 “Like I said, I know not everybody wants romance, and that’s valid, I just don’t want you denying yourself if that desire is there.” (Chapter 13)

 “Just because you experience your emotions differently from other people, Axel, doesn’t mean that experience isn’t valid, or that someone can’t love you for it. With the right person, love is possible for any of us who want it.” (Chapter 13)

Expand filter menu Content Warnings

memorable's review against another edition

Go to review page

emotional hopeful reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

I’m so happy to finally be able to read Rooney’s and Axel’s story. I really liked them both in the previous Bergman brother books and I just couldn’t wait for their story!
I loved the way they were both portrayed and how they slowly but surely found their way to love each other.
And I gotta admit that I don’t want to wait until 2022 to read the next book!

Expand filter menu Content Warnings

allisonwonderlandreads's review against another edition

Go to review page

emotional hopeful lighthearted reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.0

Chloe Liese knows how to draw me in with pure Bergman goodness. In this one, we get to see a happily ever after for Axel Bergman: artist, semi-professional recluse, and official Dog Dad even if he won't admit it. The other half of our #couplegoals is Rooney: ambitious law student, would-be nudist, and ray of sunshine. Their sexual tension has been in the background of previous books and continues in earnest here with a marriage of convenience and some seriously forced proximity. Despite the tension, I would describe it as low on angst, a tender-hearted emotional upswing even though the characters struggle, make mistakes, and get in their feelings. The book is also a love letter to the A-Frame in Washington that has been a home away from home for this reader throughout the whole series (waiting for my invite, Bergmans).

In terms of romance, Axel leaves Rooney these cute notes and doodles signed by the/his/their dog and I melted into a happy puddle at the mere idea of it. I dissolved into swoony sighs as both characters cared for each other during health scares and protected each other's hearts.  I was left cackling over the couple's panicked attempts to hide their wedding rings when family came calling, trying to keep their secret, "nonromantic" partnership under wraps.

On a serious front, Liese always knows how to bring real-life struggles and inclusivity into her stories. This one covers body image, mental & physical health, neurodivergence, and kink with an emphasis on open communication and making sure everyone feels safe. In terms of body image, Rooney is what I can report 2000s-era Seventeen magazine would call a pear shape (same), which is not commonly considered ideal, so I loved seeing it recognized and appreciated on the page. Rooney's relationship with her body is also affected by her chronic pain from IBS. The narrative highlights the way society paints her condition as embarrassing or impolite, which is not only absurd but hurtful. Axel's needs and journey with self-acceptance as a person with autism also shine through.

This romance is a crackling fire on a crisp fall day, so grab a blanket, a warm beverage, and a snuggly animal to enjoy this book at its full potential. Thanks to Chloe Liese and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. It's out now!

Expand filter menu Content Warnings
More...