Reviews

The Stone Sky, by N.K. Jemisin

rebelqueen's review against another edition

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5.0

Epic finale. Hope at the end after a whole lot of despair.

andrew_f's review against another edition

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adventurous dark emotional slow-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.75

qdony's review against another edition

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4.0

(3,5/5)

Es un buen final de la trilogía, pero una novela descompensada.

Lo mejor, la justificación del escenario, los capítulos de Nassun y el tramo final. La mezcla de ciencia ficción y fantasía mola.

sm_almon's review against another edition

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4.0

Thought-provoking.

nick96's review

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emotional medium-paced
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes

5.0

huntondl's review against another edition

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5.0

I worried NK Jemison wouldn't be able to deliver on the promise of the first two books.

I was so so wrong.

bindick's review against another edition

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5.0

such a great end for such a good series

rouver's review against another edition

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4.0

This was a powerful finale to The Broken Earth trilogy.

Essun finally comes face to face with her daughter Nassun after years of separation. Both are powerful wielders of magic but have been influenced by opposing sides of the war for the Earth. Essun hopes the end the pain of those she loves and so does Nassun, but they have very different ideas on how that could be achieved: healing or total annihilation both can end pain.

I'd definitely recommend this series. I loved it & will be picking up other books by Jemisin.

drsdon's review against another edition

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3.0

The final book in Jemisin's Broken Earth trilogy answers all the questions from the first two books - how the Earth got "broken" in the first place being the primary one. I think the pacing of this book felt faster than the prior two, as there was less world building and more tightening and wrapping up the plot (that said, there was still additional world building and history that Jemisin wove very well into the story). Perhaps because of the faster plot, or simply because all the characters have been so deeply explored in the prior two books, this book didn't feel quite a deep.

All three books examined relationships - within society primarily. This one continues that theme, providing more historical context for how those that are different are so often ostracized; how those that have become conquered and often depicted in inhumane ways long after any "threat" they might actually pose. Its hard to read these particular sections and not see the parallels in our own world history. Knowing such, the book offers a commentary on human nature that is worthy of reflection.

Another point of reflection is the relationship between parent and child - how the scars each experience, together and separately, impact the relationship. This is particularly evident in this third book, as the building tension between Essun and her daughter Nassun pushes the novel towards its end.

I've enjoyed reading the series and this book. I don't read a ton of speculative fiction - be it fantasy fiction, science fiction, or whatever, but I have enjoyed my forays into the genre.

rwmarvin's review against another edition

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5.0

Excellent trilogy. Had it recommended to me a while ago but never got to it. Read them straight through. It was hard to put down.