Reviews

The Stone Sky, by N.K. Jemisin

kostia_gorobets's review

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adventurous dark emotional hopeful sad medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.75

00leelee's review against another edition

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adventurous emotional tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

5.0

jenuinereads's review against another edition

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5.0

I finally decided to jump back in and finish out this trilogy, and now that I'm done I need a mental break again. Aside from the pure emotional impact this story has on you, the actual life lessons that come out of Jeminsin's writing just hit deep in a monumental way that really makes you think about your own life.

Some of my favorite things about her writing are still present and powerful here. A key point of this is her ability to weave multiple stories together without feeling like you're missing anything. Being able to switch between Essun and Nassun is necessary and important; we also get backstory to finally clue us in to the origins of "Evil Earth" and Oblesiks and the beginning of Stone Eaters from someone who was there when it happened. I will say that I think the first book uses this storytelling method the most impactful, but it was just as flawlessly done and necessary in this book.

***Going to talk about some specific things, vaguely. Potential spoilers below.***

I question some character development and feeling progressions but I have few memories of who I was at 11 and other things can be chalked up to things I can't see or moments that weren't included but hinted on. I never have sympathy for Schaffa. I don't know if that says something about me or not. I never felt it was supposed to be a redemption arc, even though he tells Nassun she is his redemption. I don't feel anything for him really, and I think that's the best that can happen after everything he did to Damaya/Syenite. Essun's growth was what I needed to see because it was realistic; Jeminsin did not hide the fact that growth is hard and it's a literal continual process.

I yearned for some kind of better relationship or an acknowledgment between mother and daughter, but family relations are hard, HARD. And just because you get a better understanding of someone does not mean that who they were to you, their failures and shortcomings, disappear. I learned and saw what I'm always told, a mother's love is neverending; even when your child scares you and has achieved an unbelievable amount of power. It also reinforcede that, sometimes, the hardest lessons are not lessons just things you couldn't see until it's too late.

Quick Thoughts:
The theme of colonizing, conquering, slavery, and genocide was hard but NECESSARY. Given where we are in this country, our history, and present situation, it's a hard thing to read but it's done in a way to make people see why it has a LASTING impact. Just props for how she does this.

*POTENTIAL SPOILER* Albastor's journal was ace. I appreciated seeing his inner thoughts and actually seeing he cared about Syen.

Family dynamics are hard.

Tonkee was never a favorite of mine but this book showed me that she actually does care even if she shows it a weird way.

Ykka was meant to be a leader.

A note for the full series. In full honesty, this series has positively impacted how I view relationships of all kind. I am appreciative of this.

SPOILER SKIP*********I have questions about Hoa and his feelings towards Essun, but love and life-partnership is not just a physical want. It's almost hard to see how it evolved to him wanting that but thinking about how he has been there over three books and how he's been watching and caring from a distance. I kinda get it? I like it either way.
Also, just all his backstory info was welcomed, including about Alabastor.************

allisondevine's review

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adventurous challenging dark emotional sad slow-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.0

Definitely still not hooked but I cried for Essun and for the relationship with her daughter. I liked the characters but it took a while to care about each of them. Hoax’s chapters I didn’t care for, Nassun’s sometimes, and Essun’ so liked but the closing was heartbreaking and beautiful 

inkcharms's review

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adventurous dark emotional reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

cmrams's review

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5.0

Amazing. So. Freaking. Good.
This book is fire. This trilogy is a true MUST READ.
I want to print off so many passages from these books and plaster them everywhere. Fantastical world that feels like it may have been ours - in the distant past. Themes that resonant very vividly today.

Go. Read. These. Books. Now!

radiancereads's review against another edition

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5.0

This was probably one of the best conclusions to a trilogy that I have ever read. I'm still emotional.

chadkoh's review against another edition

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4.0

What a series. So many crazy out there sci-fi concepts, her imagination is relentless and unsparing of the reader’s comprehension. Yet at the heart is a human story, with some excellent social commentary. This is what SF is supposed to be. A really important set of books, even I can recognize that, despite the feeling that there are layers that I missed or couldn’t understand. I would like to read a reader, or some analysis.

margahhrett's review against another edition

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5.0

SO INSANELY GOOD. An incredible finale and the best of the three books - ties together everything so well and is emotionally the heart of the trilogy. The first book has the best twists, the second book opens up the story, but the third, oh the third. The third makes you feel so many things; it makes the personal political by connecting the individual hardships to deeply systemic injustice. It weaves love and justice so beautifully and is deeply Afro-futurist by inquiring how a better world can be made. Beautiful. Might very well be my new favorite book.

elskeevelien's review against another edition

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4.0

3,5 stars but rounded up to 4.