rebecalynda's review against another edition

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informative slow-paced

4.0

littlegreens's review against another edition

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5.0

I loved this book. She’s succinct, witty, and gives a clear path for action-items to secure a seat at the proverbial table. As a white woman, Hart’s directives gave me ideas for how I can be a better success partner to the women of color in my professional circle. I’d highly recommend this book to all women!

nickscoby's review against another edition

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4.0

There's a popular and apparently award-winning episode of Black Mirror where a white woman finds herself trapped in a Star Trek-like situation. The ship is ruled by an exceptionally obnoxious straight white male captain. Long story short, the episode ends with the heroine having overthrown the male lead (and, hence, patriarchy) and ends with her sitting in his chair while the rest of the cast flanks her on all sides. People LOVE this episode, pointing to it as evidence of female empowerment and a mark of How Far Women Have Come.

But I was like, hold up. Wait. The supporting cast that this woman now rules are people of color or gay, including one particular fiesty black woman. Why are we throwing a party for Captain Becky, I wondered? These people were running this ship before she came along, and I am sure they would be fine without her. Are we supposed to cheer just because a woman is sitting in the seat? Why not throw the damn seat off the ship?

So this is a long intro as to why I think The Memo is important. The book's subtitle tells us that Harts will share "what women of color need to know to secure a seat at the table." And indeed that happens. Harts offers concrete tips regarding salary negotiation, for example. She offers specific questions to ask during an interview. Also included are email templates! She could've stopped there and come out #winning.

But what makes The Memo a gift that keeps on giving is the methodical way she identifies white women who are accomplices rather than advocates in the workplace. "White women cannot be trusted to always do the right thing," Harts says plainly and without apology. In fact, one of the chapters is written directly to white readers. I won't get all into it, but it comes down to y'all need to do better.

I haven't read many reviews of this book, but I can only imagine the tears! "Why can't we all get along?" white feminists may cry. Because I can be the captain of my own damn ship.

cheryl_fritz's review against another edition

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challenging hopeful informative lighthearted reflective medium-paced

3.5

pieceoftese's review against another edition

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2.0

I probably would’ve have enjoyed this more as an audio book because the writing style wasn’t for me. It felt very group chatty and it just didn’t work for me personally so I couldn’t get past the 4th chapter. This is helpful book for someone who is just getting into the workforce and some of the resources will come in handy but overall it didn’t provide much for me

_tamara8464's review against another edition

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5.0

This book was very helpful and relevant. I am going to purchase this book and use some of the advice that Minda Hart’s has recommended.

javonne's review against another edition

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5.0

This book felt like a conversation with a homegirl about our issues at work! I loved her personal stories, the advice and tips, but truly appreciated the email templates, list of career coaches, the Professional Development Platforms and Conferences. Minda is a Black woman who sincerely wants to see other Black women get ahead! I totally struggle with networking (I’m a Black woman who truly believes in no new friends and day ones only), but this has opened my eyes to how this could be hurting me professionally. Maybe even personally in some ways. Recommending this book to every woman I know, including my 13 year old daughter, and plan to invest in a career coach!

xereads's review against another edition

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3.0

Overall I think this book is good. In my opinion the intended audience could be freshly graduated (HS or college) women. As an almost 30 year old some of the information was known to me but I did appreciate the tools, resources, and self-reflection/guiding questions. Chapter 8 threw me off a bit because it’s written to our counterparts and I get what was said and its relevance but also don’t see this chapter benefiting the book’s intended audience. I also listened to the audiobook and at a certain point I was a little over the song lyrics and celebrity references

kaaviya's review against another edition

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challenging informative fast-paced

4.0

ebooks29's review against another edition

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2.0

As a black woman I was excited to read this book. I really wanted to love it but it read more like a guide to assimilating in the workplace. Don’t get me wrong she does provide some great tips. But I don’t want a seat at the table if it means I still have to wear a mask.