qu073179's review

Go to review page

3.0

Strengthening

Kinda made some great points to be taken or remembered. My biggest complaint is that this self-help seemed a little contrived, and the "sister girl" quips were a bit excessive. There were some rants in a bit of excess as well.

Other than that, this book is perfect for a 20 something going into the professional work force. I can definitely take something from this.

thespinedown's review

Go to review page

emotional informative inspiring reflective fast-paced

5.0

ab_ekpe's review against another edition

Go to review page

4.0

Nothing about the advice in this book is new; however the delivery is. And if you’re a woman of color in corporate America, this just may be the book you need to re-energize your career.

I loved the personal anecdotes Minda mentioned in order to hone in her points, and of course, I enjoyed the black pop culture references sprinkled throughout. My favorite chapter though had nothing to do with any sort of advice as it simply listed the names and accomplishments of several women of color in business. This is what I love to see! And this is the type of inspiration every woman of color needs.

majenni's review against another edition

Go to review page

funny hopeful informative inspiring reflective fast-paced

4.0

racquels's review against another edition

Go to review page

4.0

This was an interesting and useful read. I appreciate that there are actual actionable steps to position yourself for a more successful career; things that I never really thought about before but makes sense. I feel like this should be a recommended read for each college aged poc. Also I think it’s a good book to revisit every couple years if not once a year.

ralovesbooks's review against another edition

Go to review page

5.0

THIS BOOK IS A MUST READ.

I heard about this book at the conference I attended earlier this month, and I was pleasantly surprised to snap it up right away on audio. The author reads this brisk, straightforward book about women of color in the workplace, and I could not stop listening. I blew through the entire thing in less than 24 hours, and it's on my purchase list for this year. I read Lean In years ago, listening to CDs on a long commute, and I literally yelled back at that book the entire time. I didn't disagree with it so much as I took issue with the place of privilege that stemmed a lot of the perspective (even if I didn't have the words to articulate it). Where was the story of the middle manager who didn't go to an Ivy League school? Where was the story of the entry-level coordinator who didn't have connections? In this book, Minda Harts identified the cognitive dissonance I experienced when I read Lean In, and she expands on the implications in the real workplace.

I'm telling everyone - EVERYONE! - to read it. Yes, it's for women of color, but it's also for people who work with women of color, especially if you are their manager. Beyond that, the skills she talks about (networking, finding a mentor) are universal, but even more so when you are at a disadvantage of being a woman and being a person of color. So I urge you to support this author and this book by gaining the valuable information and insight from The Memo and then telling all your friends.

lucrecer's review against another edition

Go to review page

5.0

Truly a powerful book. The things Minda shares made me feel seen and understood. I don't think white women understand the trauma many Black and Brown women experience on the job. This book helped me to see many of the things I experienced on the job were not my fault and my managers and leadership failed me by choice.

Excellent book. Truly worth the read.

afro75's review against another edition

Go to review page

5.0

Minda Harts completely gives you a primer on career success. She addresses so many issues that women of color have in the work place. So many of the stories resonated with me or reminded me of the experiences my family members have had. I really enjoyed her focus on steps you can take to make your career your own. What stood out for me, was the idea of investing in myself and making mentorship a bigger part of my journey. This is a great read for professionals of all stripes, but it's a definitely created to help BIPOC women create and design their own careers.

djreads's review

Go to review page

funny informative reflective medium-paced

kazandra's review against another edition

Go to review page

4.0

The Memo by Minda Harts is a non-fiction book written to illustrate solidarity and a shared experience for women of color in the workplace and help the reader develop the skills to effectively create a seat at the table. I absolutely loved the way the author points out the mixed messages BIPOC receive such as "speak up", but are also reprimanded to greater extents than white counterparts. The author provides important tips such as "building your own squad" which is simple, but also not always an easy feat. I think many of the tips in this section are useful and actionable, however it would be helpful for the author to provide additional information on how to actually navigate in these effectively without code-switching or getting burnt out which is common for BIPOC. The writing is easy to read and the author provides some great humor throughout. Overall I enjoyed the book and will be referring to this book in the future!

Many thanks to the publisher Seal Press and Netgalley for the ARC in return for an honest review.