Reviews

Every Single Second, by Tricia Springstubb

rawhoneyroll's review against another edition

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5.0

i still don’t get the story very much. i mean i do, but i want to understand it more. i’ve got two words that would explain the novel but i don’y want to spoil! but that’s what great books are, right: they make you want to fully understand its message. i, personally directly had a soft spot for anthony.

jregensb's review against another edition

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4.0

Starring (in alphabetical order):

Birds, Brothers, Budding Romance
Cemeteries, Family Secrets, and Guns
Friendship, Mean Girls, Nice Nuns
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Prejudice
Racial Tensions, Racist Elders, and Racism,
Seconds, Statues, Stereotypes, and Strokes.

File under: Realistic Fiction, Coming of Age, Friendship

courtzab's review against another edition

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5.0

I received a signed copy of this novel by the author herself, and I am SO pleased. I may buy another copy to put in my classroom for the advanced readers to read.

This novel had everything: young romance, racial tension, PTSD, different family dynamics, socioeconomic tension, and religion. It is a very appropriate novel for what our country has been going through recently. AND it was told from the point of view of a young girl (age 5-13) who learns and grows so much throughout the novel. I adore this.

kpietens's review against another edition

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2.0

Unnecessarily tragic

sandreasen's review against another edition

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3.0

I thought it was well written but it just tried to tackle too many hot button issues.

mrskatiefitz's review against another edition

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3.0

Change is afoot for Nella Sabatini and her Italian-American neighborhood. Angela, the friend Nella used to consider a sister, has become consumed by family difficulties caused by her father's PTSD, leaving Nella to spend more time with a new friend named Clem. Nella's own father has been hiding a secret for Nella's entire life, and when Nella discovers the truth, she has trouble looking at him in the same way. Meanwhile, Nella's beloved school, St. Amphibalus, is about to shut down, leaving its students scrambling to figure out where they will attend next year. Worst of all, Angela's brother, Anthony, whom Nella has idolized her whole life has committed a deadly crime, resulting in the death of a young black man and a rise in racial tensions.

As she does in her other books (especially the Fox Street and Cody titles), Springstubb creates a believable and instantly appealing neighborhood in this latest novel, and she populates it with very real people whose secret sadnesses elicit instant sympathy from the reader. Though I wasn't crazy about the structure (switching back and forth in time, and including the internal monologue of a grave in the cemetery), the writing is, as always, gorgeous. There are many wonderfully insightful one-liners throughout the text, and vivid descriptions of places Nella visits, especially the cemetery, bring the landscape of her community fully to life. I also could not be more grateful to Springstubb for her authentic, factually correct, and overall positive portrayal of Catholic schools, practicing Catholic families, and nuns. In Nella, she has created a character who not only goes through the Catholic motions, but also observes her world, and speaks about it, from a Catholic worldview, which is both rare and refreshing.

missprint's review against another edition

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4.0

I really liked this one, and it's all the more topical with each passing day it feels. Springstubb has handled a difficult, infrequently-addressed subject with great skill.

kpietens's review

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2.0

Unnecessarily tragic

primrosesquarps's review

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5.0

I liked this book quite a bit, but I'm tagging it under spoilers since it's not supposed to be released until June. I found it in a local bookstore and picked it up not realizing that! Solid contemporary novel about an Italian-American girl living in an old but changing neighborhood, however it wasn't until about halfway through the book that it's clear what is really happening in the book. I really liked Nella's friendships with Angela and Clem, but her relationship with Sam didn't feel necessary. I do feel like the story (especially with Anthony) was wrapped up a little too neatly, but it is a kids/young adult book so I understand why.

kellyhager's review

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Powerful novel dealing with an officer-involved shooting (very appropriate timing, given recent events). But it's also about friendship (new friends and outgrowing old friends) and family. So basically it's about life.
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